Aug
05

Stanley Pranin’s Video Blog — “Fine points of Shihonage”

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“Pay special attention to placement of your
hands in order to make Shihonage effective”

In this video Stanley Pranin offers his views on some particulars of aikido’s Shihonage (four-corner throw). He discusses the generation of mechanical energy to disrupt uke’s balance through positioning, and arm and body movement, atemi, kiai, etc.

shihonage02Next, is a discussion of the positioning of the hands on uke’s arm to execute Shihonage. He proposes that a common hand placement used is ineffective and suggests using the teachings of Morihei Ueshiba and Morihiro Saito as models. Finally, a comparison of some differences in the execution of Shihonage omote and ura are presented.

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Click here to watch Stanley Pranin’s Video Blog — “Fine points of Shihonage” on youtube.com

Jul
24

Stanley Pranin’s Video Blog: “The Biggest Mistake in Kotegaeshi!”

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“From a martial art standpoint, this is a major strategic blunder!”

In this video, Stanley Pranin describes a major error commonly seen in the application of aikido’s kotegaeshi, a wrist turn throw. This strategic mistake can be seen everywhere across the spectrum in modern aikido. This clip applies “The Zone Theory of Aikido” to analyzing this problem area in kotegaeshi techniques.

Basically, the first task of nage (defender) prior to applying kotegaeshi is to avoid the attack, and unbalance uke (attacker). But then as nage sets up to execute kotegaeshi, he spins uke around for the throw. Here, uke ends up facing nage square on. At this point, nage becomes vulnerable to uke’s counterattack and is only spared an unpleasant outcome by the cooperative nature of his interaction with uke. From a martial art standpoint, this is a major strategic blunder. Other problem areas exist in today’s aikido and should be addressed.

Jul
22

Stanley Pranin’s Video Blog: “The Zone Theory of Aikido”

“Moving to the side or rear of uke, into his “blind spot,” makes it extremely easy for nage to safely execute an aikido technique.”

In this video, Aikido Journal Editor Stanley Pranin introduces a model describing the interaction between nage (defender) and uke (attacker) called “The Zone Theory of Aikido.” He explains how it is dangerous for nage to remain in front of uke when attempting to counter an attack and why the attacker has the advantage in this situation. By contrast, moving to the side or rear of uke, into his “dead zone” or “blind spot,” makes it extremely easy for nage to safely execute an aikido technique.

Click here to watch video

Jul
22

Stanley Pranin’s Video Blog: “The Zone Theory of Aikido”

“Moving to the side or rear of uke, into his “blind spot,” makes it extremely easy for nage to safely execute an aikido technique.”

In this video, Aikido Journal Editor Stanley Pranin introduces a model describing the interaction between nage (defender) and uke (attacker) called “The Zone Theory of Aikido.” He explains how it is dangerous for nage to remain in front of uke when attempting to counter an attack and why the attacker has the advantage in this situation. By contrast, moving to the side or rear of uke, into his “dead zone” or “blind spot,” makes it extremely easy for nage to safely execute an aikido technique.

It is very common for aikidoka to operate inside uke’s sphere of influence when practicing and demonstrating without questioning the strategic weaknesses of this approach. “The Zone Theory of Aikido” is an attempt to define a framework for understanding how and where to move vis-a-vis an attacker in order to set the stage for a favorable outcome.


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Watch these videos for insights into solving the
technical problems that hold back your progress!

Click here for information on Stanley Pranin's “Zone Theory of Aikido” Course

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Jul
02

Stanley Pranin’s Video Blog: “Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba’s Direct Students”

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“Collectively, these well-known Aikido teachers who studied under the Founder are responsible for the modern forms of the art more so than the Founder Morihei Ueshiba O-Sensei.”

In this video, Stanley Pranin presents an overview of the principal students of Founder Morihei Ueshiba who have been the most influential in the spread of aikido in the postwar era. Such well-known figures as Kisshomaru Ueshiba, Koichi Tohei, Kenji Tomiki, and Gozo Shioda form part of the older generation of teachers who led the way and developed many top instructors. A younger group consisting of Morihiro Saito, Sadateru Arikawa, Hiroshi Tada, Seigo Yamaguchi, Michio Hikitsuchi, Nobuyoshi Tamura, Yoshimitsu Yamada, and others were among the most active in spreading aikido abroad. If you want to understand how aikido became an internationally practiced martial art, this video will go a long way toward providing the answer.

Click here for a complete list of Stanley Pranin’s video blogs

Click here to view Stanley’s Pranin Video Blog: “Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba’s Direct Students” on youtube

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Jun
16

Stanley Pranin’s Video Blog: “From Aikijujutsu to Aikido!”

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“Morihei gradually distanced himself from the techniques of Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu over a span of more than two decades”

With the aid of rare historical photos, Stanley Pranin describes the process of Morihei Ueshiba’s gradual modification of Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu techniques into the forms that would become the basis of modern aikido. The roles of Daito-ryu and Morihei’s teacher, Sokaku Takeda, in the evolution of aikido were for many years minimized before recently becoming well documented through Stanley Pranin’s published research.

Click here for a complete list of Stanley Pranin’s video blogs

Click here to view Stanley’s Pranin Video Blog: “From Aikijujutsu to Aikido!” on youtube

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ABSOLUTE PROOF OF THE ROOTS OF
MODERN AIKIDO TECHNIQUES!

Jun
04

Stanley Pranin’s Video Blog: “Why No Competition in Aikido?”

Morihei Ueshiba teaching class at old Hombu Dojo c. 1962. Photo Courtesy of Robert Nadeau

Morihei Ueshiba teaching class at old Hombu Dojo c. 1962. Photo Courtesy of Robert Nadeau

“Tomiki Sensei’s decision to turn aikido into a sport ran contrary to
O-Sensei’s strongly held convictions about the true purpose of martial arts.”

Stanley Pranin explains why it is often noted that there is no competition in aikido. Actually, some forms of competition have been introduced in aikido, the most prominent example being Tomiki Aikido. Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba was strongly against this attempt to convert aikido into a sport. He came to have deeply held spiritual beliefs on the correct role of martial arts having seen the horrific effects of World War II on Japan.

Click here for a complete list of Stanley Pranin’s video blogs

Click here to view Stanley’s Pranin Video Blog: “Why No Competition in Aikido?” on youtube

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BEST VIDEO RESOURCE OF AIKIDO FOUNDER MORIHEI UESHIBA AVAILABLE…

Click here for information on the complete collection of Morihei Ueshiba films in downloadable format for $49.95

May
30

Stanley Pranin’s Video Blog: “Iriminage — O-Sensei Style”

“Investigating the origins of Morihei Ueshiba’s iriminage”

stanley-pranin-blog-iriminageAikido Journal Editor Stanley Pranin describes the origin and execution of Aikido’s iriminage technique as conceived by Founder Morihei Ueshiba. He explains how this essential technique has its origins in prewar Japan and was further refined in Iwama after World War II. Iriminage today is practiced in many different ways, but O-Sensei’s method, though well documented, is not widely known.

Click here for detailed information on Stanley Pranin's Zone Theory of Aikido Course

Click here to view Stanley’s Pranin Video Blog: “Iriminage — O-Sensei Style” on youtube