Nov
10

Make Your Techniques Work! Stanley Pranin’s “Zone Theory of Aikido Course”!

Stanley Pranin’s “Zone Theory of Aikido Course”!

“Rethinking Aikido Training From The Bottom Up!”

stanley-pranin-encyHi, I’m Stanley Pranin here to tell you about my new online video course, the “Zone Theory of Aikido”.

You know I’ve been involved in Aikido for more than 50 years. To tell the truth, Aikido has been my life. I can’t think of a better discipline to train well-rounded, fit people with excellent self-defense skills.

That being said, I believe we still have a long way to go to develop more refined teaching methodologies to accelerate students’ advancement in the art.

What do I mean? Well, I travel frequently in Aikido circles and train with practitioners of many different styles. I’ve found similar training patterns regardless of the approach to Aikido. I consider one of the biggest hurdles to improving one’s skills is the almost universal tendency to resort to physical strength in attempting to make techniques work.

When aikido practitioners get stuck, they tense up and try to force their way through the technique. I see this everywhere I go. For many years, I experienced the same thing in my own training. Only recently, have I been able to discover ways of using the body as a unified structure when applying techniques. What a difference this has made!

This has been a liberating discovery that has allowed me to totally rethink my way of approaching the execution of techniques. My techniques work now, consistently, even against training partners of superior strength. This has never happened before!

In the “Zone Theory of Aikido” video course consisting of 25 lessons, I’m going to walk you through this innovative approach to doing aikido. I will show you ways of using your body more efficiently. I will explain the importance of positioning, balance-breaking… how to use atemi, kiai, and O-Sensei’s hitoemi stance to give you a tremendous advantage in practice. I look forward to sharing this whole new world of training principles and strategies with you.

Get it today and watch your progress accelerate!

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Jun
17

Stanley Pranin talks about relaxation and positioning at aikido seminar in Mexico

In this Spanish-language video, Stanley Pranin talks about the importance of relaxation, body unification, and positioning. This katatedori unbalancing movement followed by an entry into uke’s blind spot, puts one in an excellent position to execute ikkyo through yonkyo.

Click here for detailed information on Stanley Pranin's Zone Theory of Aikido Course

Sep
09

Video: Stanley Pranin — “An Aikido Life”

“If those elements that formed part of O-Sensei’s aikido were reintroduced into the art, I think the general technical skills of aikidoka would greatly improve.”

Aikido Journal Editor Stanley Pranin presents an overview of his career in Aikido focusing primarily on his lengthy experience in Japan as a researcher and publisher. Pranin conducted hundreds of interviews with many of the luminaries of the Aikido world who were responsible for the postwar development of the art.

Aikido Journal Editor Stanley Pranin interviews Doshu Kisshomaru Ueshiba in 1977

Aikido Journal Editor Stanley Pranin interviews Doshu Kisshomaru Ueshiba in 1977


The results of his historical research and these interviews appeared over the years in the Aiki News and Aikido Journal magazines, and in the various books he published on Aikido in English and Japanese.

Stanley Pranin with Koichi Tohei, Founder of Ki no Kenkyukai in 1995

Stanley Pranin with Koichi Tohei, Founder of Ki no Kenkyukai in 1995

To Pranin’s way of thinking, there are many things missing in today’s aikido. If those elements that formed part of Morihei Ueshiba O-Sensei’s aikido were reintroduced into the art, he is of the belief that the general technical skills of aikidoka would greatly improve.

Stanley Pranin with Morihiro Saito Sensei in Canada in 1979

Stanley Pranin with Morihiro Saito Sensei in Canada in 1979

Those interested in arranging an Aikido seminar with Stanley Pranin make contact him through Aikido Journal.

Click here to watch Stanley Pranin — “An Aikido Life” on youtube.com

Nov
04

“Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi: Part 20 – Migi Nagare Gaeshi Tsuki” by James Neiman

Introduction

This is the 20th in a 27-part series on the Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi, and the final presentation within the Aiki Jo Suburi presented by James Neiman, Dojo Cho of Shugyo Aikido Dojo, where martial arts instruction in Union City, California is offered. All the articles are paired with YouTube video demonstrations of each of the Suburi (click here to subscribe to the channel, and click here to view all the articles in this series). These paired demonstrations and articles are offered to Aikidoka who would like to more fully understand the precise mechanics within each of the Suburi, how they can be practiced in both solo and partner settings, and how one can align the Suburi with taijutsu to develop increasing competence and precision with both basic and advanced technique.

Migi Nagare Gaeshi Tsuki

In this article we examine Migi Nagare Gaeshi Tsuki, which is the 20th and final exercise of the Aiki Jo Suburi, and 2nd in the series known as the Nagare No Bu. Click here to view a video demonstration of the components of this Suburi. In summary, Migi Nagare Gaeshi Tsuki is a combination techniques: it begins with the first movement from Gyaku Yokomen Ushiro Tsuki, followed by a right-oriented turn into an overhead block (the counterpart to Hidari Nagare Gaeshi Uchi), and ends with a basic thrust (the principal movement of the Tsuki No Bu series). Its purpose is to highlight for the student the possibility of combining multiple suburi into meaningful combinations of offensive and defensive movements with multiple ukes, in this case simply by virtue of introducing a basic grip change to transition between the basic techniques. In the two Nagare No Bu suburi, the transition is effected through a pivot in the case of Hidari Nagare Gaeshi Uchi (Morote Dori footwork) and a turn in this case (Tae No Henko). The exercise requires a fluid combination of movements that can be divided into 3 major sections:

  1. Gyaku Yokomen
  2. Turn and Block
  3. Thrust

[Read more...]

Oct
26

“Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi: Part 19 – Hidari Nagare Gaeshi Uchi” by James Neiman

Introduction

This is the 19th in a 27-part series on the Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi presented by James Neiman, Dojo Cho of Shugyo Aikido Dojo, where martial arts instruction in Union City, California is offered. All the articles are paired with YouTube video demonstrations of each of the Suburi (click here to subscribe to the channel, and click here to view all the articles in this series). These paired demonstrations and articles are offered to Aikidoka who would like to more fully understand the precise mechanics within each of the Suburi, how they can be practiced in both solo and partner settings, and how one can align the Suburi with taijutsu to develop increasing competence and precision with both basic and advanced technique.

Hidari Nagare Gaeshi Uchi

In this article we examine Hidari Nagare Gaeshi Uchi, which is the 19th of the Aiki Jo Suburi, and 1st in the series known as the Nagare No Bu. Click here to view a video demonstration of the components of this Suburi. In summary, Hidari Nagare Gaeshi Uchi is a combination techniques: it begins with Shomen Uchi Komi, followed by a left-oriented pivot into an overhead block and strike combination derived from Tsuki Jodan Gaeshi Uchi. Its purpose is to highlight for the student the possibility of combining multiple suburi into meaningful combinations of offensive and defensive movements with multiple ukes, in this case simply by virtue of introducing a basic grip change to transition between the basic techniques. The exercise requires a fluid combination of movements that can be divided into 3 major sections:

  1. Shomen Uchi Komi
  2. Pivot and Block
  3. Strike

 
[Read more...]

Oct
22

Video: Impromptu Aikido Demonstration by Stanley Pranin

This is a short impromptu demonstration I gave at a private aikido seminar in Las Vegas on October 6, 2012. The occasion was a private workshop I gave titled “Exploring Morihei Ueshiba O-Sensei’s Aikido.” Over the weekend, I presented some historical background information that attempted to explain how it is that we came to practice the aikido we do today, who was responsible, and what is the nature of the curriculum and pedagogy. For an explanation in article form, please see “Towards A Reform of Aikido Technique (1): Background.”

I will be conducting an aikido seminar jointly with Pat Hendricks Sensei, 7th dan, in Las Vegas on March 9-10, 2013 for those of persons interested in these ideas and how they translate to training and technique.

Oct
11

“Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi: Part 18 – Hasso Gaeshi Ushiro Harai” by James Neiman

Introduction

This is the 18th in a 27-part series on the Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi presented by James Neiman, Dojo Cho of Shugyo Aikido Dojo, where martial arts instruction in Union City, California is offered. All the articles are paired with YouTube video demonstrations of each of the Suburi (click here to subscribe to the channel, and click here to view all the articles in this series). These paired demonstrations and articles are offered to Aikidoka who would like to more fully understand the precise mechanics within each of the Suburi, how they can be practiced in both solo and partner settings, and how one can align the Suburi with taijutsu to develop increasing competence and precision with both basic and advanced technique.

Hasso Gaeshi Ushiro Harai

In this article we examine Hasso Gaeshi Ushiro Harai, which is the 5th and final suburi of the Aiki Jo Suburi in the series known as the Hasso No Bu. Click here to view a video demonstration of the components of this Suburi. In summary, Hasso Gaeshi Ushiro Harai contains part of a figure-8 movement, resulting in a block followed by a turning, sweeping strike. This exercise continues the orientation toward multiple ukes in the Hasso No Bu. The exercise requires a fluid combination of movements that can be divided into 3 major sections:

  1. Initiate Rotation and Block
  2. Re-orient your body for movement in the rear direction
  3. Complete the sweeping strike

 
[Read more...]

Oct
09

Video: Hayato Osawa demonstrates his powerful style of aikido

In this video, Hayato Osawa, son of the late 9th dan Kisaburo Osawa, displays his style of strong, precise aikido. His techniques are characterized by a strong martial spirit and physicality even though he is of a small stature. He demonstrates suwariwaza, hanmi handachi, and standing techniques on this occasion. Osawa Sensei is one of the senior instructors at the Aikikai Hombu Dojo in Tokyo.

Click here to view the video of Hayato Osawa demonstrating aikido techniques

Oct
04

“Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi: Part 17 – Hasso Gaeshi Ushiro Uchi” by James Neiman

Introduction

This is the 17th in a 27-part series on the Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi presented by James Neiman, Dojo Cho of Shugyo Aikido Dojo, where martial arts instruction in Union City, California is offered. All the articles are paired with YouTube video demonstrations of each of the Suburi (click here to subscribe to the channel, and click here to view all the articles in this series). These paired demonstrations and articles are offered to Aikidoka who would like to more fully understand the precise mechanics within each of the Suburi, how they can be practiced in both solo and partner settings, and how one can align the Suburi with taijutsu to develop increasing competence and precision with both basic and advanced technique.

Hasso Gaeshi Ushiro Uchi

In this article we examine Hasso Gaeshi Ushiro Uchi, which is the 4th of the Aiki Jo Suburi in the series known as the Hasso No Bu. Click here to view a video demonstration of the components of this Suburi. In summary, Hasso Gaeshi Ushiro Uchi contains part of a figure-8 movement, resulting in a block followed by a strike in the rear direction. This exercise continues the orientation toward multiple ukes in the Hasso No Bu. The exercise requires a fluid combination of movements that can be divided into 3 major sections:

  1. Initiate Rotation and Block
  2. Re-orient your body for movement in the rear direction
  3. Complete the rear moving strike


[Read more...]

Sep
26

“Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi: Part 16 – Hasso Gaeshi Ushiro Tsuki” by James Neiman

Introduction

This is the 16th in a 27-part series on the Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi presented by James Neiman, Dojo Cho of Shugyo Aikido Dojo, where martial arts instruction in Union City, California is offered. All the articles are paired with YouTube video demonstrations of each of the Suburi (click here to subscribe to the channel, and click here to view all the articles in this series). These paired demonstrations and articles are offered to Aikidoka who would like to more fully understand the precise mechanics within each of the Suburi, how they can be practiced in both solo and partner settings, and how one can align the Suburi with taijutsu to develop increasing competence and precision with both basic and advanced technique.

Hasso Gaeshi Ushiro Tsuki

In this article we examine Hasso Gaeshi Ushiro Tsuki, which is the 3rd of the Aiki Jo Suburi in the series known as the Hasso No Bu. Click here to view a video demonstration of the components of this Suburi. In summary, Hasso Gaeshi Ushiro Tsuki contains part of a figure-8 movement, resulting in a block followed by a rear moving thrust to another uke. This particular exercise is a transition point within the Hasso No Bu, in which a second uke is introduced. The exercise requires a fluid combination of movements that can be divided into 3 major sections:

  1. Initiate Rotation and Block
  2. Re-orient your body for movement in the rear direction
  3. Complete the rear moving thrust

[Read more...]

Sep
23

Video: Bruce Bookman demonstrates Ushiro Kubishime

“Bruce Bookman explains and demonstrates ushiro kubishime and kotegaeshi!”

My aikido practice includes early influences of Yoshimitsu Yamada, and later practice under Kisshomaru Ueshiba, and other prominent teachers in Japan at the Aikikai Headquarters such as Osawa, Yamaguchi, Arikawa, and Tada Senseis. I spent 16 years practicing under T.K. Chiba Sensei, who was a very close disciple of Morihei Uyeshiba, the Founder of Aikido. I have done extensive cross training in other martial arts including 12 years of Brazilian Jiu jitsu, 10 years of Iai-do (2 of those years studying with Takeishi Mitsuzuka Sensei in Tokyo), 2 years of Judo, 2 years of western boxing and 2 years of tea kwon do. I have practiced yoga on and off since childhood…

Click here to view the video of Bruce Bookman Sensei demonstrating Ushiro Kubishime

Sep
16

Video: Morihiro Saito teaches Ushiro Eridori Techniques

“Aikido teachers can build an entire lesson plan on the contents of this video!”

An excellent compilation of seminar techniques including advanced katatedori techniques, and a lengthy series of ushiro eridori techniques. Videos such as these highlight Saito Sensei’s skilled pedagogy and encyclopedic knowledge of aikido technique. Morihiro Saito was one of the closest and talented of Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba’s students in the postwar period. Over his nearly 60 year aikido career, Saito Sensei taught widely both in Japan and abroad and left an important body of book and video materials that are considered among the best sources on aikido technique.

Click here to view the video of Morihiro Saito teaching ushiro eridori techniques