Dec
29

Biography of Tempu Nakamura: “Heaven’s_Wind_Part_III,” by Stephen Earle

A chapter from Stephen Earle’s seminal English biography of Tempu Nakamura…

“The emerging current in Japanese intellectual circles that most appealed to Sun’s sensibilities was what has subsequently been termed pan-Asianism. In the 1920s and 30s, this term would be turned into a euphemism for Japanese imperialism, but in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries the doctrine it described was largely pure in intent. Its proponents were motivated by a genuine desire to see Asia freed from the yoke of Western colonialism and brought into its own as a collection of sovereign states under indigenous rule. As concerned China, in response to the English-American “open door” doctrine that only thinly masked intentions of partition, Japan supported a “preserve China” policy that favored reform and modernization adequate to withstand Western aggression.”

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Dec
15

Brian Kagen pick: “The Need to Adapt,” by Rik Ellis

“Anyone who has used Aikido in a truly hostile situation, will tell you that it looked nothing like the training in the dojo, one needs to be able to adapt him/herself and their technique to the situation they are faced with. My Aikido is in my mind, and throughout my body, I make absolutely no pretence of offering myself on a plate to my opponent with a stylised Aikido posture, the biggest mistake in the cage or street is to offer your opponent your leading leg or arm, you will be down before you know what is happenening, then all your Aiki nonsense will be pounded out of you. ( welcome to the real world ).”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

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Dec
04

Brian Kagen pick: “Re: YouTube: Golden Center Sword,” by George Ledyard via aikiweb.com

“While I am a consistent critic of Aikido with no “aiki”, that physical, muscly, art that is simply application of strength against weak lines of the opponent, at least there is something there going on that’s real. It won’t work against someone stronger or better trained than you are and it lacks any real depth but it is “real” in what it is. I know, I trained that way for years myself.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

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Nov
15

Brian Kagen pick: “California Aikido Association Dojo-cho & Senior Instructors”

“The Aikido of Northern California Yudansha Kai was organized in 1974 by black belt holders dedicated to the task of exploring the path shown by Master Ueshiba, and to teaching Aikido philosophy and techniques to all those who wished to follow. In 1980, the name of the Yudansha Kai was changed to Aikido Association of Northern California (AANC) to take into consideration the many people represented by the association who are not black belt holders. By 2001 the AANC had evolved into 3 divisions and had grown to over 100 member dojos. The California Aikido Association (CAA) was formed in 2002, from a majority of the AANC membership, based upon the principle of training together in friendship with a minimum of formal organizational structure. The CAA is affiliated with Hombu Dojo, Aikido Headquarters, in Tokyo, Japan.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

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Nov
11

“Linda Holiday – A Martial Artist Making a Difference,” by Paul Rest from examiner.com

I asked Linda Sensei this question: “If you could have tea with O Sensei, what question or questions would you ask him?” Linda replied, “When I was in my 20’s I lived for several years in the remote Kumano area of Japan where I trained intensively under traditional Aikido teachers who had studied directly with Osensei. As I studied Aikido with them, I was also immersed in learning Japanese language, culture, and etiquette. In traditional Japan, students do not question the teacher. Rather, they observe, intuit, absorb, and emulate. So when I try to imagine what question I would ask Osensei, my first response is: I wouldn’t.”

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Linda Holiday’s school: Aikido of Santa Cruz

Nov
09

Brian Kagen pick: “Hawaii Karate Museum Collection” from University of Hawaii at Manoa

“The Okinawa Collection of UHM’s Hamilton Library received a major donation of books, magazines and multi-media resources (over 700 books and CDs/DVDs/video tapes) on karate from the Hawaii Karate Museum. With this important donation, UHM Hamilton Library has become a major resource for Okinawan/Japanese martial arts. The majority of the books are accessible at the Asia and East general collections (3rd & 4th floors). Over 260 rare books and journals have been placed in the Asia Special Collections (4th floor). Advance appointments are necessary to use materials in the Asia Special Collections.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Nov
05

Brian Kagen pick: “Focus and Aikido Training,” by Francis Takahashi from aikiweb.com

“There is no doubt in my mind, based on my training and experience, that the Founder’s art form and original techniques were designed to be effective, and to be validly accepted as genuine martial techniques by other genuine and sincere martial artists and masters within the martial arts brotherhood. Nonetheless, the vast majority of students who train in Aikido, instructors and trainees alike, do not appear to have the ability nor the training to properly “focus”, and have their Aikido techniques reach their desired potential of effectiveness, authenticity and respectability.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Nov
02

“Brian Kagen pick: “Redlands martial arts studio emphasizes tradition, inner development,” by Joy Juedes, RedlandsDailyFacts Staff Writer

“Martial arts, to Chetan Prakash, is not about showing off. Prakash has studied aikido, a Japanese martial art, since 1983, and began teaching it in 1994. He opened Redlands Aikikai on Nevada Street in 2004. In February, he moved it across the street to a new facility. ‘The real reason we do this is we just love it,’ said Prakash, a math professor at Cal State San Bernardino. “There are ways to make lots of money in martial arts but you have to make compromises and we don’t do that.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Oct
26

Brian Kagen pick: “Ashley’s Secret: “Aikido Chess,” Review by Michael Jeffreys

“Like with Aikido, you are using your opponent’s movement/energy against him. ‘Okay, he pushed a pawn… now the two old squares it was guarding are no longer guarded… how can I use this to my advantage?’ or ‘His bishop came off of the a2 – g8 diagonal and now his knight is no longer defended. How can I exploit this?’”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Oct
10

Brian Kagen pick: “Kathleen Bloom – A Martial Artist Making a Difference,” by Paul Rest

“Kathleen began her martial arts training in Seattle at the Seattle School of Aikido. Moving to California brought many changes in her life—three children, an undergraduate degree and graduate school but alas no time for Aikido. She notes that there were “years of ballet and yoga, but nothing could replace Aikido as a path of transformation. Not just physically, but spiritually as well. I was hungry to return to a dojo.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

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Oct
08

Brian Kagen pick: “7 Samurai Myths,” from the spaciousplanet.com

“The popular image of the Japanese Samurai warrior as a well educated, spiritual and honorable gentlemen does not tell the whole story. Each generation tells the story of the Samurai according to its own values and attitudes rather than based on history. Some common myths about Samurai include…”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

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Oct
05

Brian Kagen pick: “Masahiko Kimura,” from wikipedia.com

“Kimura’s remarkable success can in part be attributed to his fanatical training regimen. He reportedly lost only four judo matches in his lifetime, all occurring in 1935.[4] He considered quitting judo after those losses, but through the encouragement of friends he began training again. He consistently practiced the leg throw Osoto Gari (Large Outer Reap) against a tree. After six months his technique was such that daily randori or sparring sessions at various dojos resulted in 10 people with concussions.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

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