May
20

From AJ forum: “Too old to learn Aikido?”

There is an interesting thread on the Aikido Journal forum of which the following is an excerpt on aging and aikido that may be of interest to some readers:

“I am just about ready to test for 6th kyu. My training has really paid off. The One Point technique has helped me manage my free floating anxiety. Thanks to regular training, I was ready to help a nurse where I work avoid getting slugged by an angry patient. As the patient drew back to hit the nurse, I just calmly stepped in and made a simple block. The duress team took it from there. Afterwards, I was shocked that I did it. I really, really like Aikido.”

Mar
12

From AJ forum: “On Kashima Shin-ryu and Aikido”

There is an interesting thread on the Aikido Journal forum of which the following is an excerpt on the relationship between Kashima Shin-ryu and aikido started by froggy that may be of interest to some readers:

Mr. Tissier’s swordwork derives from Kashima-Shinryu, via Inaba Minoru, the head Aikido instructor at the Meiji Grand Shrine in Tokyo. It is NOT, however, Kashima-Shinryu–in either a formal or a practical sense.

Inaba has worked a bit of Kashima-Shinryu kenjutsu and some other weapon training into his aikido curriculum at the Meiji Grand Shrine. Neither he nor his teacher, Tanaka Shigeo, however, has any formal connections with the current Kashima-Shinryu soke or shihanke, and neither has any Kashima-Shinryu license or diploma from either Kunii Zen’ya (the previous soke/shihanke) or Seki Humitake (the current shihanke; Inaba has a diploma written by Kunii, but unsigned, which he received from Kunii’s widow).
[Read more...]

Mar
11

“How to Get Bruce Lee Like Strength Without Ever Going to a Gym” by Jonathan Mead

“While you may not get to Bruce Lee’s level overnight, you can start getting in shape without the use of a lot of fancy (and expensive) equipment. You can do it from the comfort of your own home, in a space as large as a bathroom.

Part of the reason I started training without a gym was because I began training in Jeet Kune Do (Bruce Lee’s method of martial arts). But I also got tired of paying monthly gym dues. At the time, I was looking for things I could cut out of my monthly budget to save a little extra money.

I thought about getting rid of my gym membership altogether, but I didn’t want to sacrifice my health or physical fitness. So I found another way. For months, I haven’t had a gym membership, yet I’m getting stronger and faster than I’ve ever been in my life.”

Please click here to read entire article.

Mar
10

Brian Kagen pick: “A History of the Kodokan” by Kim Sol

“The founding of Takenouchi Ryu in 1532 is the earliest reliable record of what we think of as ju jitsu, and appears to have been a formulation of unarmed fighting techniques which were undoubtedly present in the culture, and surely as an adjunct to the armed combat systems of Japan, which were reaching their maximum influence and development during that century.(2)

After the Battle of Sekigahara in 1601, the Edo Period began. During this long interesting era, authentic armed combat systems began a decline as the long period of peace associated with the Tokugawa Shogunate sapped martial ardor from the military classes. Ju jitsu, on the other hand, began a flowering and development which continued into the nineteenth century, resulting in the establishment by then of more than 725 documented schools of ju jitsu, expressing a wide variety of unarmed combat methodologies and specialities. They were referred to as “ryu” which means school, but these were not educational schools, to the contrary, they were typically businesses, teaching these various fighting methods which could include grappling, throwing, kicking and punching techniques.”

Please click here to read entire article.

Feb
26

“Strikes. Take It… or Grieve It…” by Vladimir Vasiliev

“There is also an approach of taking strikes by withstanding pain, deliberately toughening up and tightening up various body parts. Aside from the ultimately destructive effect of such practice, it would only work for a visible, anticipated strike, while in place. But what if you have not seen the strike come or if you were on the move? Then you would need alternate relaxation of muscles.

I have seen how an unexpected punch can send a skilled martial artist into a state of disorientation, shock, panic, resentment, and many other counterproductive conditions. Moreover, I have never seen anyone capable of avoiding all strikes in a mass attack or crowd fight. You can easily verify it yourself in a group of 10 or more fighters. ”

Please click here to read entire article.

See our excellent selection of Systema DVDs at Aikido Journal.

Feb
26

From AJ forum: “Jo Awase” by Autrelle Holland

The following post by Autrelle Holland is excerpted from a thread currently in progress in the Aikido Journal forums:

“While doing my research and gathering input and feedback from the people kind enough to review my notes, I have learned much. The Aiki Jo system as it is contains so much information that I think myself a fool to even try to put the basics down. I’m glad that I did though, and I recommend that any serious Aikidoka practicing any sort of formal weapons curriculum to notes somewhere. I know that there are some teachers that don’t use a strict set of guidelines regarding weapons which is fine. To really delve into the practice of it, I feel that you need a core. In my research, the core items of Aiki Jo are the 20 Jo Suburi, the 31- and 13 Jo Kata, the 31 Kata Kumijo and 13 Jo Kata Awase, and lastly, the Jo Awase techniques.”
[Read more...]

Feb
21

“New Internet Martial Arts TV Show: Katana” by from budo-warrior.com

“In the dark recess of the Yakuza underworld, a sibling rivalry erupts into a full-blown civil war for control of a Japanese crime family.

In a desperate bid to win, a Yakuza underling (KENJI SATO) does the unthinkable; he kidnaps the daughter of a former assassin, hoping to use him to eliminate his rivals. The assassin however, is his own brother (TOSHIRO SATO), who disappeared years ago to start a new life.”

Please click here to read entire article.

Jan
12

From AJ forums: “Too old to learn Aikido?”

The following post by Jorge Garcia is excerpted from a thread currently in progress in the Aikido Journal forums:

“You’re not too old but you need to know what to expect. I am 52 now and doing great. I can run almost anyone in the dojo into the ground and I train every day of the year. I have been injured but I just protect the injury and keep going.

Having said that, I started when I was 38 and out of shape. I experienced dizziness when learning to roll and that continued for many months. I was frequently exhausted and had to stop. Everything in my body hurt and I always had some form of pain in my body up until last year. These were pains that moved around and I just hurt. My shins, feet, heels, forearms, back and ankles hurt- in short – everything.”
[Read more...]

Sep
17

AJ forum link: ” The O in O sensei”

The following text is excerpted from a discussion in progress on the Aikido Journal Forums:

“I think it should be mentioned that the term used would differ depending on whether the person was being addressed directly.

For example, if I were addressing the Second Doshu Kisshomaru Ueshiba, I would always call him ‘Sensei.’ However, if I were referring to him in the third person I would use Doshu.

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Sep
02

From AJ Forums: “My first experience with Kondo Sensei” by Giacomo Merello

The following text is excerpted from a discussion concerning training in Daito-ryu aikijujutsu with Katsuyuki Kondo Sensei in progress on the Aikido Journal Forums:

Dear posters and everybody,

I just got back to Italy after spending one month in Tokyo to practice martial arts. During this month I also spent some time training Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu under Kondo Sensei. I was very lucky, because I received almost everytime direct instruction by him or by Amano Sensei, so I had the chance to practice with the strongest exponent of Mainline Daito-ryu.

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Aug
29

From AJ Forums: “Why is it that uke starts attacking in front of nage”

The following post by John Driscoll is excerpted from a thread currently in progress in the Aikido Journal forums titled “Ushiro waza”:

Why is it that uke starts attacking in front of nage when uke’s intention is to grab from behind?

“I would argue that starting from a static position with uke behind tori (shite) is the simplest way to teach ushiro waza, not having someone deal with the complexities of closing maai, trapping hands, etc.
[Read more...]