Jul
26

“Elements of Aiki Weapons Partner Practices Part 4: Hasso Gaeshi with the Jo” by James Neiman

Introduction

O’Sensei’s development of practices involving the Aiki Ken and Jo were passed on to successive generations in the Iwama tradition, and have, to this day, continued to be developed as partner practices often referred to as the Ken Tai Jo, Kumi Jo, and Kumi Tachi. Based on the skills and movements inherent to the Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi, Morihiro Saito Shihan and Hitohiro Saito Shihan have continued to build and refine the weapons partner practices so that it is possible to practice fluid dynamics using both offensive and defensive tactics. From these practices Aikidoka can extend the ideas to develop precise technique in relationship to one or more attackers with both empty-handed taijutsu and more general weapons partner practices. The basis for the utility of the practices is the usage of large external objects that increase visibility and awareness of all aspects of Aikido technique, as well as distancing, movement, energy extension and absorption, and timing.

At Shugyo Aikido Dojo we teach the Suburi, Ken Tai Jo, Kumi Jo, and Kumi Tachi to all students as part of a standardized curriculum in the traditions passed to us through our lineage with Morihiro Saito Shihan, Hitohiro Saito Shihan, and Pat Hendricks Shihan, and we encourage advanced students to continue exploring variations on the standard repertoire and identify connections with empty-handed partner practices.

Because of the continuous evolution of the partner practices, and out of respect for the leaders of our style, this series focuses on generally applicable elements of the partner practices, rather than laying out entire sequences that are subject to change. This approach will help ensure that the skills discussed will never become obsolete, as opposed to the practice sequences, which can and do change often. For example, at this moment in time, the 1st Ken Tai Jo involves parries as part of a lengthy series of interactions between two partners. Instead of attempting to describe the entire 1st Ken Tai Jo, the more limited and productive goal in a given paired article and video would be to describe only a parry, which is involved in several other partner practices as well. It is much more empowering to practice and master one individual movement at a time, because this allows the Aikidoka to use those movements in any way desired, and easily mimic any contemporary sequences.

This is the 4th in a multi-part series on the elements of the Ken Tai Jo, Kumi Jo, and Kumi Tachi. All articles in the series are paired with YouTube video demonstrations of each of the partner practice elements (click here to subscribe to the channel). These paired demonstrations and articles are offered to Aikidoka who would like to more fully understand the precise mechanics within each of the weapons partner practices, how they can be practiced in both solo and partner settings, and how one can align the practices with taijutsu to develop increasing competence and precision with both basic and advanced technique.

Note: all the practices described in these articles assume a ki no nagare relationship, meaning that the attacks and defenses occur simultaneously.

Hasso Gaeshi with the Jo

In this article on the Aiki weapons partner practices, we examine the skill of using a hasso gaeshi parry with your jo against an attack. The scenario to be considered is that the jo is on the left side of your body but the attack is coming toward your right side. The attack may come in the form of a thrust or strike with a jo or bokken, and the goal is to absorb and deflect the attack while stepping back, using a parrying motion with the tip of the jo that is initially pointing toward the rear, and continuing into a hasso gaeshi motion to prepare a counterattack or additional parry. Click here to view a video demonstration of the components of this partner practice. The exercise requires a fluid combination of movements that can be divided into 3 major sections:

  1. Drop and connect
  2. Transfer momentum backward
  3. Anchor and parry

 
[Read more...]

May
03

“Elements of Aiki Weapons Partner Practices Part 3: Reverse Parry with the Jo” by James Neiman

Introduction

O’Sensei’s development of practices involving the Aiki Ken and Jo were passed on to successive generations in the Iwama tradition, and have, to this day, continued to be developed as partner practices often referred to as the Ken Tai Jo, Kumi Jo, and Kumi Tachi. Based on the skills and movements inherent to the Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi, Morihiro Saito Shihan and Hitohiro Saito Shihan have continued to build and refine the weapons partner practices so that it is possible to practice fluid dynamics using both offensive and defensive tactics. From these practices Aikidoka can extend the ideas to develop precise technique in relationship to one or more attackers with both empty-handed taijutsu and more general weapons partner practices. The basis for the utility of the practices is the usage of large external objects that increase visibility and awareness of all aspects of Aikido technique, as well as distancing, movement, energy extension and absorption, and timing.

At Shugyo Aikido Dojo we teach the Suburi, Ken Tai Jo, Kumi Jo, and Kumi Tachi to all students as part of a standardized curriculum in the traditions passed to us through our lineage with Morihiro Saito Shihan, Hitohiro Saito Shihan, and Pat Hendricks Shihan, and we encourage advanced students to continue exploring variations on the standard repertoire and identify connections with empty-handed partner practices.

Because of the continuous evolution of the partner practices, and out of respect for the leaders of our style, this series focuses on generally applicable elements of the partner practices, rather than laying out entire sequences that are subject to change. This approach will help ensure that the skills discussed will never become obsolete, as opposed to the practice sequences, which can and do change often. For example, at this moment in time, the 1st Ken Tai Jo involves parries as part of a lengthy series of interactions between two partners. Instead of attempting to describe the entire 1st Ken Tai Jo, the more limited and productive goal in a given paired article and video would be to describe only a parry, which is involved in several other partner practices as well. It is much more empowering to practice and master one individual movement at a time, because this allows the Aikidoka to use those movements in any way desired, and easily mimic any contemporary sequences.

This is the 3rd in a multi-part series on the elements of the Ken Tai Jo, Kumi Jo, and Kumi Tachi. All articles in the series are paired with YouTube video demonstrations of each of the partner practice elements (click here to subscribe to the channel). These paired demonstrations and articles are offered to Aikidoka who would like to more fully understand the precise mechanics within each of the weapons partner practices, how they can be practiced in both solo and partner settings, and how one can align the practices with taijutsu to develop increasing competence and precision with both basic and advanced technique.

Note: all the practices described in these articles assume a ki no nagare relationship, meaning that the attacks and defenses occur simultaneously.

Reverse Parry with the Jo

In this article on the Aiki weapons partner practices, we examine the skill of using a reverse parry with your jo against an attack. The scenario to be considered is that the jo is on the left side of your body but the attack is coming toward your right side. The attack may come in the form of a thrust or strike with a jo or bokken, and the goal is to absorb and deflect the attack while stepping back, using a parrying motion with the tip of the jo that is initially pointing toward the rear. Click here to view a video demonstration of the components of this partner practice. The exercise requires a fluid combination of movements that can be divided into 3 major sections:

  1. Drop and connect
  2. Transfer momentum backward
  3. Anchor and parry

[Read more...]

Mar
30

“Elements of Aiki Weapons Partner Practices Part 2: Brush Block with the Jo” by James Neiman

Introduction

O’Sensei’s development of practices involving the Aiki Ken and Jo were passed on to successive generations in the Iwama tradition, and have, to this day, continued to be developed as partner practices often referred to as the Ken Tai Jo, Kumi Jo, and Kumi Tachi. Based on the skills and movements inherent to the Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi, Morihiro Saito Shihan and Hitohiro Saito Shihan have continued to build and refine the weapons partner practices so that it is possible to practice fluid dynamics using both offensive and defensive tactics. From these practices Aikidoka can extend the ideas to develop precise technique in relationship to one or more attackers with both empty-handed taijutsu and more general weapons partner practices. The basis for the utility of the practices is the usage of large external objects that increase visibility and awareness of all aspects of Aikido technique, as well as distancing, movement, energy extension and absorption, and timing.

At Shugyo Aikido Dojo we teach the Suburi, Ken Tai Jo, Kumi Jo, and Kumi Tachi to all students as part of a standardized curriculum in the traditions passed to us through our lineage with Morihiro Saito Shihan, Hitohiro Saito Shihan, and Pat Hendricks Shihan, and we encourage advanced students to continue exploring variations on the standard repertoire and identify connections with empty-handed partner practices.

Because of the continuous evolution of the partner practices, and out of respect for the leaders of our style, this series focuses on generally applicable elements of the partner practices, rather than laying out entire sequences that are subject to change. This approach will help ensure that the skills discussed will never become obsolete, as opposed to the practice sequences, which can and do change often. For example, at this moment in time, the 1st Ken Tai Jo involves parries as part of a lengthy series of interactions between two partners. Instead of attempting to describe the entire 1st Ken Tai Jo, the more limited and productive goal in a given paired article and video would be to describe only a parry, which is involved in several other partner practices as well. It is much more empowering to practice and master one individual movement at a time, because this allows the Aikidoka to use those movements in any way desired, and easily mimic any contemporary sequences.

This is the 2nd in a multi-part series on the elements of the Ken Tai Jo, Kumi Jo, and Kumi Tachi. All articles in the series are paired with YouTube video demonstrations of each of the partner practice elements (click here to subscribe to the channel). These paired demonstrations and articles are offered to Aikidoka who would like to more fully understand the precise mechanics within each of the weapons partner practices, how they can be practiced in both solo and partner settings, and how one can align the practices with taijutsu to develop increasing competence and precision with both basic and advanced technique.

Note: all the practices described in these articles assume a ki no nagare relationship, meaning that the attacks and defenses occur simultaneously.

Brush Block with the Jo

In this initial article on the Aiki weapons partner practices, we examine the skill of using a brush block against an attack using your jo. The attack may come in the form of a thrust or strike with a jo or bokken, and the goal is to absorb and deflect the attack while stepping back, using a brush block motion. Click here to view a video demonstration of the components of this partner practice. The exercise requires a fluid combination of movements that can be divided into 3 major sections:

  1. Drop and connect
  2. Transfer momentum backward
  3. Anchor and block

 
[Read more...]

Mar
04

“Elements of Aiki Weapons Partner Practices Part 1: Parrying with the Jo” by James Neiman

Introduction

O’Sensei’s development of practices involving the Aiki Ken and Jo were passed on to successive generations in the Iwama tradition, and have, to this day, continued to be developed as partner practices often referred to as the Ken Tai Jo, Kumi Jo, and Kumi Tachi. Based on the skills and movements inherent to the Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi, Morihiro Saito Shihan and Hitohiro Saito Shihan have continued to build and refine the weapons partner practices so that it is possible to practice fluid dynamics using both offensive and defensive tactics. From these practices Aikidoka can extend the ideas to develop precise technique in relationship to one or more attackers with both empty-handed taijutsu and more general weapons partner practices. The basis for the utility of the practices is the usage of large external objects that increase visibility and awareness of all aspects of Aikido technique, as well as distancing, movement, energy extension and absorption, and timing.

At Shugyo Aikido Dojo we teach the Suburi, Ken Tai Jo, Kumi Jo, and Kumi Tachi to all students as part of a standardized curriculum in the traditions passed to us through our lineage with Morihiro Saito Shihan, Hitohiro Saito Shihan, and Pat Hendricks Shihan, and we encourage advanced students to continue exploring variations on the standard repertoire and identify connections with empty-handed partner practices.

Because of the continuous evolution of the partner practices, and out of respect for the leaders of our style, this series focuses on generally applicable elements of the partner practices, rather than laying out entire sequences that are subject to change. This approach will help ensure that the skills discussed will never become obsolete, as opposed to the practice sequences, which can and do change often. For example, at this moment in time, the 1st Ken Tai Jo involves parries as part of a lengthy series of interactions between two partners. Instead of attempting to describe the entire 1st Ken Tai Jo, the more limited and productive goal in a given paired article and video would be to describe only a parry, which is involved in several other partner practices as well. It is much more empowering to practice and master one individual movement at a time, because this allows the Aikidoka to use those movements in any way desired, and easily mimic any contemporary sequences.
[Read more...]

Feb
01

“Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi: Part 27 – Shichi No Ken Suburi” by James Neiman

Introduction

This is the 27th and final article in a 27-part series on the Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi, and the 7th in a series of 7 articles on the Aiki Ken Suburi. All articles in the series are paired with YouTube video demonstrations of each of the Suburi (click here to subscribe to the channel). These paired demonstrations and articles are offered to Aikidoka who would like to more fully understand the precise mechanics within each of the Suburi, how they can be practiced in both solo and partner settings, and how one can align the Suburi with taijutsu to develop increasing competence and precision with both basic and advanced technique.

Shichi No Suburi

In this article on the Aiki Ken, we examine Shichi No Suburi, which is the seventh and last of the Aiki Ken Suburi. In summary, Shichi No Suburi is nearly identical to Rokku No Suburi, with the distinct difference of adding a movement about the line of attack to thrust on the left side. This exercise, the final of the Aiki Ken Suburi, is the second in a two-part culmination of the study of these Suburi. Click here to view a video demonstration of the components of this Suburi. The exercise requires a fluid combination of movements that can be divided into 9 major sections:

  1. Ni no suburi
  2. Left Side Thrust
  3. The yokomen strike from Go no suburi
  4. Left Side Thrust
  5. Pivot and shomen strike
  6. Left Side Thrust
  7. The yokomen strike from Go no suburi
  8. Left Side Thrust
  9. Pivot and shomen strike

[Read more...]

Jan
28

“Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi: Part 26 – Rokku No Ken Suburi” by James Neiman

Introduction

This is the 26th in a 27-part series on the Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi, and the 6th in a series of 7 articles on the Aiki Ken Suburi. All articles in the series are paired with YouTube video demonstrations of each of the Suburi (click here to subscribe to the channel). These paired demonstrations and articles are offered to Aikidoka who would like to more fully understand the precise mechanics within each of the Suburi, how they can be practiced in both solo and partner settings, and how one can align the Suburi with taijutsu to develop increasing competence and precision with both basic and advanced technique.

Rokku No Suburi

In this article on the Aiki Ken, we examine Rokku No Suburi, which is the sixth of the Aiki Ken Suburi. In summary, Rokku No Suburi adds a thrust to a combination of previously studied strikes and movements, representing the first in a two-part culmination of the study of Aiki Ken Suburi. Click here to view a video demonstration of the components of this Suburi. The exercise requires a fluid combination of movements that can be divided into 9 major sections:

  1. Ni no suburi
  2. Thrust
  3. The yokomen strike from Go no suburi
  4. Thrust
  5. Pivot and shomen strike
  6. Thrust
  7. The yokomen strike from Go no suburi
  8. Thrust
  9. Pivot and shomen strike

[Read more...]

Jan
19

“Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi: Part 25 – Go No Ken Suburi” by James Neiman

Introduction

O’Sensei developed the Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi, which thankfully have been faithfully preserved and transmitted as excellent forms from which Aikidoka can develop precise technique in both empty-handed taijutsu and weapons partner practices. The basis for the utility of Suburi is the introduction of large external objects that increase visibility and awareness of all aspects of Aikido technique.

At Shugyo Aikido Dojo we teach the Suburi to beginners as part of a standardized curriculum in the traditions passed to us through our lineage with Morihiro Saito Shihan, Hitohiro Saito Shihan, and Pat Hendricks Shihan, and we encourage advanced students to continue exploring the Suburi as a means to deepen competence in all aspects of Aikido.

The Suburi are helpful exercises that enable students to put into meaningful practice their understanding of lines and positioning, develop hanmi, kokyu, and dynamic balance, establish effective movement from center and hips, and work on timing of movement and breath. They are the subatomic particles that comprise our more complex movements, and provide an invaluable opportunity to refine and perfect the innumerable details that go into each technique. The more deeply we explore and live with the Suburi, the greater the connection we find with all forms of Aikido technique. The Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi truly are a magnificent creation by O’Sensei, and his beautiful gift to all of us contains the key and gateway to mastery of the art. The more advanced we become, the more deeply we are invited to explore the Suburi, and the greater the reward of discovery this path offers.

This is the 25th in a 27-part series on the Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi, and the 5th in a series of 7 articles on the Aiki Ken Suburi. All articles in the series are paired with YouTube video demonstrations of each of the Suburi (click here to subscribe to the channel). These paired demonstrations and articles are offered to Aikidoka who would like to more fully understand the precise mechanics within each of the Suburi, how they can be practiced in both solo and partner settings, and how one can align the Suburi with taijutsu to develop increasing competence and precision with both basic and advanced technique.

Go No Suburi

In this article on the Aiki Ken, we examine Go No Suburi, which is the fifth of the Aiki Ken Suburi. In summary, Go No Suburi is an application of the quintessential yokomen strike, including the symmetry of both left and right orientation. Click here to view a video demonstration of the components of this Suburi. The exercise requires a fluid combination of movements that can be divided into 4 major sections:

  1. Right and left side yokomen strikes
  2. Pivot and shomen strike
  3. Right and left side yokomen strikes
  4. Pivot and final shomen strike

[Read more...]

Jan
06

“Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi: Part 24 – Yon No Ken Suburi” by James Neiman

Introduction

O’Sensei developed the Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi, which thankfully have been faithfully preserved and transmitted as excellent forms from which Aikidoka can develop precise technique in both empty-handed taijutsu and weapons partner practices. The basis for the utility of Suburi is the introduction of large external objects that increase visibility and awareness of all aspects of Aikido technique.

At Shugyo Aikido Dojo we teach the Suburi to beginners as part of a standardized curriculum in the traditions passed to us through our lineage with Morihiro Saito Shihan, Hitohiro Saito Shihan, and Pat Hendricks Shihan, and we encourage advanced students to continue exploring the Suburi as a means to deepen competence in all aspects of Aikido.

The Suburi are helpful exercises that enable students to put into meaningful practice their understanding of lines and positioning, develop hanmi, kokyu, and dynamic balance, establish effective movement from center and hips, and work on timing of movement and breath. They are the subatomic particles that comprise our more complex movements, and provide an invaluable opportunity to refine and perfect the innumerable details that go into each technique. The more deeply we explore and live with the Suburi, the greater the connection we find with all forms of Aikido technique. The Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi truly are a magnificent creation by O’Sensei, and his beautiful gift to all of us contains the key and gateway to mastery of the art. The more advanced we become, the more deeply we are invited to explore the Suburi, and the greater the reward of discovery this path offers.

This is the 24th in a 27-part series on the Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi, and the 4th in a series of 7 articles on the Aiki Ken Suburi. All articles in the series are paired with YouTube video demonstrations of each of the Suburi (click here to subscribe to the channel). These paired demonstrations and articles are offered to Aikidoka who would like to more fully understand the precise mechanics within each of the Suburi, how they can be practiced in both solo and partner settings, and how one can align the Suburi with taijutsu to develop increasing competence and precision with both basic and advanced technique.

Yon No Suburi

In this article on the Aiki Ken, we examine Yon No Suburi, which is the fourth of the Aiki Ken Suburi. In summary, Yon No Suburi is an application of the quintessential shomen strike, adding the symmetry of both left and right orientation to the strike. Click here to view a video demonstration of the components of this Suburi. The exercise requires a fluid combination of movements that can be divided into 4 major sections:

  1. Right and left side shomen strikes
  2. Pivot
  3. Right and left side shomen strikes
  4. Pivot and final shomen strike


[Read more...]

Dec
21

“Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi: Part 23 – San No Ken Suburi” by James Neiman

Introduction

This is the 23rd in a 27-part series on the Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi, and the 3rd in a series of 7 articles on the Aiki Ken Suburi. All articles in the series are paired with YouTube video demonstrations of each of the Suburi (click here to subscribe to the channel). These paired demonstrations and articles are offered to Aikidoka who would like to more fully understand the precise mechanics within each of the Suburi, how they can be practiced in both solo and partner settings, and how one can align the Suburi with taijutsu to develop increasing competence and precision with both basic and advanced technique.

San No Suburi

In this article on the Aiki Ken, we examine San No Suburi, which is the third of the Aiki Ken Suburi. In summary, San No Suburi adds a ki-filled hidden component to the shomen strike, yielding a basic exercise in the fundamental use of energy as part of basic technique. Click here to view a video demonstration of the components of this Suburi. The exercise requires a fluid combination of movements that can be divided into 4 major sections:

  1. Drop Back
  2. Gather Energy
  3. Enter
  4. Strike


[Read more...]

Dec
08

“Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi: Part 22 – Ni No Ken Suburi” by James Neiman

Introduction

This is the 22nd in a 27-part series on the Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi, and the 2nd in a series of 7 articles on the Aiki Ken Suburi. All articles in the series are paired with YouTube video demonstrations of each of the Suburi (click here to subscribe to the channel). These paired demonstrations and articles are offered to Aikidoka who would like to more fully understand the precise mechanics within each of the Suburi, how they can be practiced in both solo and partner settings, and how one can align the Suburi with taijutsu to develop increasing competence and precision with both basic and advanced technique.

Ni No Suburi

In this article on the Aiki Ken, we examine Ni No Suburi, which is the second of the Aiki Ken Suburi. In summary, Ni No Suburi adds a defensive movement off the line to the shomen strike, yielding a basic exercise that introduces blending as part of basic technique. Click here to view a video demonstration of the components of this Suburi. The exercise requires a fluid combination of movements that can be divided into 3 major sections:

  1. Drop back
  2. Enter
  3. Strike

[Read more...]

Nov
29

“Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi: Part 21 – Ichi No Ken Suburi” by James Neiman

Introduction

O’Sensei developed the Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi, which thankfully have been faithfully preserved and transmitted as excellent forms from which Aikidoka can develop precise technique in both empty-handed taijutsu and weapons partner practices. The basis for the utility of Suburi is the introduction of large external objects that increase visibility and awareness of all aspects of Aikido technique.

At Shugyo Aikido Dojo we teach the Suburi to beginners as part of a standardized curriculum in the traditions passed to us through our lineage with Morihiro Saito Shihan, Hitohiro Saito Shihan, and Pat Hendricks Shihan, and we encourage advanced students to continue exploring the Suburi as a means to deepen competence in all aspects of Aikido.

The Suburi are helpful exercises that enable students to put into meaningful practice their understanding of lines and positioning, develop hanmi, kokyu, and dynamic balance, establish effective movement from center and hips, and work on timing of movement and breath. They are the subatomic particles that comprise our more complex movements, and provide an invaluable opportunity to refine and perfect the innumerable details that go into each technique. The more deeply we explore and live with the Suburi, the greater the connection we find with all forms of Aikido technique. The Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi truly are a magnificent creation by O’Sensei, and his beautiful gift to all of us contains the key and gateway to mastery of the art. The more advanced we become, the more deeply we are invited to explore the Suburi, and the greater the reward of discovery this path offers.

This is the 21st in a 27-part series on the Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi, and the first in a series of 7 articles on the Aiki Ken Suburi. All articles in the series are paired with YouTube video demonstrations of each of the Suburi (click here to subscribe to the channel). These paired demonstrations and articles are offered to Aikidoka who would like to more fully understand the precise mechanics within each of the Suburi, how they can be practiced in both solo and partner settings, and how one can align the Suburi with taijutsu to develop increasing competence and precision with both basic and advanced technique.

Ichi No Suburi

In this initial article on the Aiki Ken, we examine Ichi No Suburi, which is the first of the Aiki Ken Suburi. In summary, Ichi No Suburi is the quintessential shomen strike, and a profoundly important exercise in developing hanmi and kokyu. Click here to view a video demonstration of the components of this Suburi. The exercise requires a fluid combination of movements that can be divided into 3 major sections:

  1. Gather energy
  2. Transfer momentum forward
  3. Complete strike

 
[Read more...]

Nov
04

“Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi: Part 20 – Migi Nagare Gaeshi Tsuki” by James Neiman

Introduction

This is the 20th in a 27-part series on the Aiki Ken and Jo Suburi, and the final presentation within the Aiki Jo Suburi presented by James Neiman, Dojo Cho of Shugyo Aikido Dojo, where martial arts instruction in Union City, California is offered. All the articles are paired with YouTube video demonstrations of each of the Suburi (click here to subscribe to the channel, and click here to view all the articles in this series). These paired demonstrations and articles are offered to Aikidoka who would like to more fully understand the precise mechanics within each of the Suburi, how they can be practiced in both solo and partner settings, and how one can align the Suburi with taijutsu to develop increasing competence and precision with both basic and advanced technique.

Migi Nagare Gaeshi Tsuki

In this article we examine Migi Nagare Gaeshi Tsuki, which is the 20th and final exercise of the Aiki Jo Suburi, and 2nd in the series known as the Nagare No Bu. Click here to view a video demonstration of the components of this Suburi. In summary, Migi Nagare Gaeshi Tsuki is a combination techniques: it begins with the first movement from Gyaku Yokomen Ushiro Tsuki, followed by a right-oriented turn into an overhead block (the counterpart to Hidari Nagare Gaeshi Uchi), and ends with a basic thrust (the principal movement of the Tsuki No Bu series). Its purpose is to highlight for the student the possibility of combining multiple suburi into meaningful combinations of offensive and defensive movements with multiple ukes, in this case simply by virtue of introducing a basic grip change to transition between the basic techniques. In the two Nagare No Bu suburi, the transition is effected through a pivot in the case of Hidari Nagare Gaeshi Uchi (Morote Dori footwork) and a turn in this case (Tae No Henko). The exercise requires a fluid combination of movements that can be divided into 3 major sections:

  1. Gyaku Yokomen
  2. Turn and Block
  3. Thrust

[Read more...]