Dec
29

Video: Rare photo of Tokimune Takeda inside the Abashiri Dojo

My teacher Tokimune Sensei — Sokaku’s son — told me that whenever he was teaching as his father’s representative, if he showed his students something more than once in order to have them better understand, his father would scold him for being “foolishly soft-hearted.” When I myself was learning from Tokimune, he often warned me, “If you teach the same technique twice, the second time your students will figure out how to reverse it and defeat you with it. For that reason, teach something different the second time.”

Click here to read more about Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu

Dec
28

Video: Do NOT Punch In A Street Fight… Over 8,000,000 views!

“These first two knuckles are going to get nailed… It’s like hitting a wall!” An interesting analysis of the dangers of using a punch in an actual altercation along with a series of suggestions for accomplishing the effects of a punch without causing injury to your hand. This video has over 8,000,000 views!

Click here to watch video

Dec
28

Daito-ryu AikiJujitsu: “Out of a thousand pupils, teach the true techniques only to one or two.”

The present volume contains descriptions of Daito-ryu techniques just as I learned them from Tokimune Sensei from the time I began training under him in 1961 until his death in 1993, now a full 32 years. If there are points that seem different from other styles, then those are probably the most important areas to focus upon. I hope that these comments will provide good hints for further study.

Click here to read more and view video

Dec
28

Katsuyuki Kondo on Daito-ryu book: “I worried about revealing the secret teachings of the art”

In truth, when first approached about publishing a technical volume on Daito-ryu, I had quite a few reservations. To begin with, much of the material in the ikkajo series has already been covered in several videotapes released some years ago. Further, given the traditionally closed, secretive nature of Daito-ryu, I worried to what degree it would be appropriate for me to disclose the oral and inner teachings of the art with which I have been entrusted to those outside the school.

Click here to read more and view video

Dec
28

Katsuyuki Kondo: “The difference between aikido and Daito-ryu is ‘Aiki’”

The difference between aikido and Daito-ryu in the eyes of the general public is that in techniques of Daito-ryu you must break the balance of your opponent the instant you touch him. This is because there is aiki in the technique, which we use to break the balance of the opponent. This is a major characteristic of Daito-ryu.

Click here to read the entire interview

Dec
28

Video: Masatoshi Yasuno, 7th dan, at 50th All-Japan Aikido Demonstration (2012)

A demonstration of the unique aikido of Masatoshi Yasuno, 7th dan Aikikai instructor. Yasuno Sensei’s art in this demonstration consists of soft, blending movements with powerful throwing bursts. He was one of the long-time students of Seigo Yamaguchi Sensei, the famous Aikikai instructors of the first postwar generation of teachers.

Click here to watch the video of Masatoshi Yasuno Sensei

Dec
27

“Nearly all aikido techniques derive from Sokaku Takeda’s Daito-ryu Aikijujitsu”

In the traditional martial arts, a secret technique is usually taught at the very beginning. In Daito-ryu, too, we teach a difficult technique first. This ippondori, I believe, has become ikkyo in aikido…

Click here to watch the video

Dec
27

“In-depth interview with Katsuyuki Kondo, Daito-ryu Master”


Sokaku Sensei traveled all over, from Hokkaido in the north all the way to Okinawa in the south. It is also remarkable that he taught not only in police departments of one particular region, but throughout the entire country. I believe that if his technique was fake or ineffective, he would have been considered useless because police departments could easily exchange such information.

Click here to read the entire interview

Dec
27

“Is Aikido a traditional martial art,” by Francis Takahashi

“One need not prepare for a fight, if one resolves
never to be near one or can walk away from one.”

Per Wikipedia, the following definition is one of many interpretations and beliefs, but arguably the most identifiable and accepted version by most cultures of what the notion of “martial arts” has meant over the ages, and what it means today.

The martial arts are codified systems and traditions of combat practices. They are practiced for a variety of reasons, including self-defense, competition, physical health and fitness, as well as mental, physical, and spiritual development.

The term martial art has become heavily associated with the fighting arts of eastern Asia, but was originally used in regard to the combat systems of Europe as early as the 1550s. An English fencing manual of 1639 used the term in reference specifically to the “Science and Art” of swordplay. The term is ultimately derived from Latin, and means “Arts of Mars,” where Mars is the Roman god of war.[1] Some martial arts are considered ‘traditional’ and are tied to an ethnic, cultural or religious background, while others are modern systems developed either by a founder or an association.

Based on this definition, I cannot consider Aikido to be a “traditional” martial art, one consistently and primarily associated with combat, competition or comparative skills assessment. Since Morihei Ueshiba, the Founder of Aikido, has repeatedly, clearly and emphatically denied that his Aikido was founded for fighting purposes, we need to take him at his word and cease trying to compare and contrast his Aikido to the combat efficacy, existing examples of martial integrity, or any history of success in battlefield conditions of other martial arts systems. We are comparing agates to diamonds, which is totally ludicrous, a waste of resources, and fully ignorant of what Ueshiba’s Aikido truly was intended for, or of why it enjoys the popularity it has genuinely earned.

For the 60 years that I have been involved with the study of the Aikido of the Founder, I have wondered almost daily as to whether the system I was studying would actually help me in a physical altercation or fight. Fortunately, I have never had to answer that question, probably out of dumb luck, and perhaps due to the fact that I was larger than most, and acted as if I was not an easy mark. Now, as I draw nearer to the end of my journey of self discovery, and can better assess what I have actually achieved, the answers are no easier to find than before. Nonetheless, the myriad questions and doubts themselves have dwindled quite a bit, disappearing to merely a few.
[Read more...]

Dec
26

Seigo Okamoto — balance-breaking from seiza

Seigo Okamoto, founder of the Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu Roppokai, demonstrates the fine points of the basic and advanced techniques of this soft-style of Daito-ryu. The Roppokai features many unusual unbalancing techniques seen in no other art.

Click here to read more on Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu

Dec
26

Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu: “The crux of the problem between Morihei and Sokaku”

I suspect that at the root of the problems between the two were Sokaku’s demanding personality, Ueshiba’s independent attitude and spiritual orientation, and the vague financial arrangements with regard to Morihei’s obligations as a certified instructor of Daito-ryu.

Click here to read the article on Daito-ryu history

Dec
26

“Boundaries,” by Nev Sagiba

Maai is the functional study of relationship boundaries and of the nuances of the natural forces that go into making them. Boundaries exist to protect a centre. There are infinite centres reflecting the one universal core.

People let their minds entangle in the space between boundaries and because it appears to be empty, become hypnotized by a concept of no-concept into which they insert their fears and ideas and their own mind then defeats them. Reality is what is happening while your mind was writing another script. These false assumptions born of fear then lead to violence of some kind.

The principle of musubi unites the boundaries and dances with the energy exchange between them bringing the natural economy of energy exchange to a balance where it may settle. Respect being the ultimate social lubricant it enables a constructive paradigm of existence to take place and to vivify those core values which carry us through time by uniting us as a species who can thrive against the odds.

All of human suffering comes from the disregard of, and the transgression of either real, imagined or other boundaries.

Often territory is hard earned, but it can also be stolen. Stolen territory whilst filled with the energy stolen from the rightful owners is fraught with mishap. The hungry ghosts of injustice do not rest until they have fed on the souls of the perpetrators. This is why all empires fall. Murder is not a building block but a corrosive acid.
[Read more...]