Jun
10

“Ki no Musubi – A Meeting of Minds,” by Nev Sagiba

To Melanesian islanders, being of “one mind, means exactly that. And this is why the more heavily populated Niuginis never successfully invaded them for over 50,000 years of trying to do so.

In principles of law, A Meeting of Minds (consensus ad idem) is the primary requirement for, and the definition of a contract.

In natural thinking there can be seen what could be called a Divine Principle at work.

A platoon who are indeed “of one mind” are invincible.

That, united we stand and divided we fall, is more than a cliché.

Where two or more are gathered together with proper intention, all things become possible.

Uniting body and mind forms the active principle of ki.

No matter how hard or soft you train, in the Budo dojo, people practicing are conducting a process of reconciling intention. By contrast, contest oriented dojo augment the disease of contention, but in a second hand and sort of safe way with rules. This is not Budo training but a separatist ego delusion.

Real contest is best avoided. Real contest is final. Real contest means people will die and predictable consequences will follow with inevitability.

The meeting of minds has many benefits. More so, it is our inevitable destiny as a species. After human beings learn to reclaim themselves from various forms of tyranny, including the ones we make for ourselves, fear, doubt, greed etc., the next logical outcome is consensus. Not consensus of opinion, because opinion is always in error, but consensus in factuality, with clarity of understanding as a basis.

To arrive at that state, a certain measure of foresight about best outcomes is an essential. Generally we learn this over aeons through the consequences of bad decisions. We learn from experience and correcting mistakes.

Good Budo training, in particular, good Aiki Budo training speeds up the process to become possible in one life, within the generation you find yourself.

Good Budo training is a scientific study of cause and effect based on ruthlessly unmitigated honesty. Contest is the opposite. Contest carries the opinion of some form of “superiority,” which it then strives to prove by destructive means, ultimately failing. Temporary appearances of “victory” are just that, appearances which do not last long. The only true victory following a victory over oneself, is when all life subsequently wins as a result. It is a process of care, nurture, protection and cultivating a harmonious creative spirit in action.

No person can be an island. All life is interdependent. When fully isolated the individual first goes mad, then dies. Total isolation from the whole is a natural impossibility. Those who strive for it and find it, succeed only in destroying themselves in a very final manner.

In the beginning all was one. It then differentiated as the universal outbreath expanded. Destiny dictates the return, but by gently expanding awareness, minds are capable of meeting sooner notwithstanding, because the universe is composed of light, the great connector of all things, making this possible.

But first we have to find our mind in fullness of clarity, the surface mind being merely an offshoot of greater life gifted to all creatures of habit. Beyond habit exists a deeper and more complete realm, the foundation of soul, if you will, where minds having met, can move forward to create harmoniously.

As humans we have the tools and the abilities to proceed forward in this way as a choice. Or we can choose to drift.

The fruit of outcomes will bear witness to the decisions we made.

Nev Sagiba
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Comments

  1. Nev, this is an outstanding piece of writing, particularly the distinction between budo training and competition. You’ve nailed the crucial difference!