Jan
25

24-hour Sale: Get 1-year subscription + Back issue DVD for $19.95!

Today, for this week’s special, it is our pleasure to offer you two items for the price of one. First, a 1-year subscription to the Online Aikido Journal. Secondly, you get one of the most information-rich and useful of the resources available through Aikido Journal. I speak of our back issue DVD that contains an amazing amount of material! All of this is yours for only $19.95 during this 24-hour sale.

Your purchase of this special will bring you an inexhaustible source of information about every important aspect of aikido. You will never finish reading everything… there is simply too much material… and it is expanding all the time! Your understanding and outlook on aikido will grow exponentially.

Your subscription gives you full access to the ever-growing Aikido Journal archives consisting of more than 650 articles.

Your Back-issue DVD contains:

  • 26 years of back issues of Aiki News / Aikido Journal
  • More than 4,300 page scans in resizable format
  • Each issue presented in Acrobat PDF format with article links
  • Special Bonus: 4-hour audio lecture on Aikido history by Editor-in-chief Stanley Pranin
  • Added Bonus: Complete “Encyclopedia of Aikido” written by Aikido Journal Editor Stanley Pranin published in 1991 presented in PDF format. 238 pages including hundreds of biographies and terms, a dojo directory, chronology of Morihei Ueshiba, and a subject bibliography

Order link for special: 1-year subscription to Online Aikido Journal + Back issue DVD for only $19.95

This offer can only be accessed through the link above. Please click on the “Order link” to access your discount, place the item in your shopping cart, and proceed to checkout.

The clock starts NOW!

We look forward to this opportunity to serve you!

Stanley Pranin

Jan
25

“Forty Hours of SCARS,” by Herb Borkland

“The Scientific Combat Reactionary System (SCARS) is the official hand-to-weapon fighting system of the United States Navy SEAL Teams. SCARS is now declassified and out on tape. It’s also being taught by its creator, Jerry Peterson, to a limited number of civilians, on a once-in-a-blue-moon basis.”

Click here to read entire article.

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Jan
25

“Jack Lalanne and the Hands of Time,” by Stanley Pranin

On Sunday, fitness guru and entrepreneur Jack Lalanne died at the ripe old age of 96. He led a story-book life that included adoption at an early age of a healthy lifestyle filled with exercise and a strict diet regimen. I first remember him for his tv exercise programs of the 1950s. I watched him many times as a boy and sometimes did his workouts. Jack accomplished many incredible strength and endurance feats that seemed utterly impossible even into his 70s.

Jack was also one of the early pioneers in the fitness movement. He designed many of the early bodybuilding machines and went on to open a string of health clubs that was later sold to the Bally company. Lalanne also marketed a popular line of blenders and juicing machines and advocated a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, and some fish.

His business activities made him a millionaire and one of the early examples of a successful entrepreneur in the health and fitness movement. Jack was very intelligent and a good speaker. He would not only demonstrate and explain his exercises, but offer motivational words to inspire his students.

Listen to Jack talking about “The Hands of Time.”

The words below from Wikipedia sum up Jack Lalanne’s philosophy of life:

“I train like I’m training for the Olympics or for a Mr. America contest, the way I’ve always trained my whole life. You see, life is a battlefield. Life is survival of the fittest. How many healthy people do you know? How many happy people do you know? Think about it. People work at dying, they don’t work at living. My workout is my obligation to life. It’s my tranquilizer. It’s part of the way I tell the truth — and telling the truth is what’s kept me going all these years.”

Jack Lalanne was and will always be an inspiration.

Jan
24

Recommended reading: “Interview with Swordmaster: Kiyoshi Nakakura (2)” by Stanley Pranin

The article below with Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba’s adopted son, Kiyoshi Nakakura (aka Morihiro Ueshiba) has been selected from the extensive archives of the Online Aikido Journal. We believe that an informed readership with knowledge of the history, techniques and philosophy of aikido is essential to the growth of the art and its adherence to the principles espoused by Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba.

The art [of Ueshiba Sensei] was called “Daito-ryu” because of the connection with Sokaku Takeda. Then a few years later it was changed to Aikido. It seems that while I was there, various names were used for the art. For example, “Aioi-ryu” or “Aiki Budo” and so on. I think that the name “Aikido” was used quite a bit later. The dojo was built before I enrolled but its name was changed to the Kobukan while I was there, probably around 1932 or 1933. The land used to be part of a mansion called the “Tsugaru” which was owned by a lord of Aomori Prefecture. The Ueshibas used to rent a section of about 100 tsubo (one tsubo = 3.954 sq. yds.). I think it was around the time I was leaving the dojo that they were asked to buy the land and they did.

Aikido Journal Online has the world’s largest archive of Aikido-related material including articles, interviews, photographs and video clips. As an Aikido Journal Online subscriber you will have access to a variety of website resources reserved exclusively for members. These include:

  • Full access to the ever-growing Aikido Journal archives consisting of more than 650 articles.
  • Full access to Stanley Pranin’s “Encyclopedia of Aikido” featuring some 900 entries with over 200 rare photos.
  • Full access to an ever growing collection of technical and historical video clips featuring many of the best-known exponents of aikido, Daito-ryu aikijujutsu, and other arts.

Besides these advantages, by becoming an Aikido Journal Online subscriber, you help support our staff in its continuing work of researching and documenting the history of aikido, Daito-ryu aikijujutsu, and related martial arts.

Finally, we are pleased to offer two free gifts for those readers who subscribe or renew for two years. In an effort to avoid any duplication of gift items, we have expanded the options to choose from. Click here to find out more information about our subscription/renewal options.

Click here to read entire article.

Jan
24

“…Of that which may never have happened,” by Charles Warren

These are just thoughts that occur to me which might fit aikido history of forty years ago. The context is the videos I’ve seen of Tohei Sensei, the Second Doshu Kisshomaru Ueshiba, and Morihiro Saito Sensei.

I see Tohei relishing the limelight as he is filmed performing facile imitations of O Sensei’s later years. There was a spontaneity which seemed to conjure techniques that might only be seen once. I wouldn’t go so far as to say they were without substance, it is just that there didn’t seem to be enough foundation in that young man to fill out that old man “impression”. And he seemed to be enjoying himself to the point of upstaging O Sensei on occasion. For O Sensei, zanshin was probably never absent even if invisible. With Tohei it was not obvious.
[Read more...]

Jan
24

“Living in the Long Rhythms,” from Glimmerscape

“The encouraging thing about the yin yang symbol is that at the center of the strongest portion of one aspect you have the tiny seed potential of the other. This is comforting too, especially when, as you navigate the very long rhythms of life, you find yourself adrift from your source of vitality and strength. And even though I haven’t trained in almost two years, I know that the tiny seed of keiko is pulsing along beside me, waiting to grow again as the rhythm shifts.”

Click here to read entire article.

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Jan
23

“Budo and injuries,” by the Budo Bum

“So, the Tuesday before Christmas, I went to Judo and had a great practice for the first 88 minutes of the 90 minute practice. Then I proceeded to bend my right knee 45 degrees to the right while failing to throw my partner. I discovered that my knee does not like being bent in that direction. In the aftermath, I am having to put into practice some lessons I’ve picked up over the years of budo training.”

Click here to read entire article.

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Jan
22

Recommended reading: “Interview with Kazuo Chiba” by Stanley Pranin

The interview below with T.K. Chiba Sensei, 8th dan, has been selected from the extensive archives of the Online Aikido Journal. We believe that an informed readership with knowledge of the history, techniques and philosophy of aikido is essential to the growth of the art and its adherence to the principles espoused by Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba.

As a young man of eighteen, Kazuo Chiba took one look at a photograph of Morihei Ueshiba in a book and knew that his search for a true master of budo had ended. Now 8th dan and chief instructor at the San Diego Aikikai, Chiba recounts episodes from his years as an uchideshi, and provides a detailed explanation of the concept of shu-ha-ri, as well as explaining his own view of the modern aikido world.

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Jan
22

“News from Inside the Cave,” from Sword Mountain Aikido & Zen

“Sword Mountain Aikido and Zen is admittedly a selfish pursuit: it absolutely reflects my current state and direction of practice. Since the objective is always an integrated practice and life, sometimes that means less practice in favor of more life.”

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Jan
21

Recommended reading: “Morihei Ueshiba and Morihiro Saito” by Stanley Pranin

The article below has been selected from the extensive archives of the Online Aikido Journal. We believe that an informed readership with knowledge of the history, techniques and philosophy of aikido is essential to the growth of the art and its adherence to the principles espoused by Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba.

Morihiro Saito was a skinny, unimpressive lad of 18 when he first met Morihei Ueshiba in sleepy Iwama-mura in July 1946. It was shortly after the end of World War II and practice of the martial arts was prohibited by the GHQ. The founder had been “officially” retired in Iwama for several years although in reality he was engaged in intensive training and meditation in these secluded surroundings. Indeed, it was during the Iwama years during and after World War II that Morihei Ueshiba was in the process of perfecting modern aikido.

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Jan
21

“Age and conditioning,” by Rick Berry

“I recently had a conversation with my senior student and best friend regarding his physical condition. He is 60 years old and his wife commented about good he looks for his age. He attributed his conditioning to 38 years of martial arts training. Punching, kicking and all-around sparring, kata and everything else that goes with it.”

Click here to read entire article.

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Jan
20

Recommended reading: “A Bit of Background” by Meik Skoss

The article below by researcher Meik Skoss has been selected from the extensive archives of the Online Aikido Journal. We believe that an informed readership with knowledge of the history, techniques and philosophy of aikido is essential to the growth of the art and its adherence to the principles espoused by Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba.

Although systematic training in the use of weapons, and methods for employing them in warfare existed long before, it is generally believed that the development of martial traditions, schools, or styles (ryu-ha) did not arise until after the end of the Heian period (794-1185). Central to this training was study of the bow (yumi), the sword (tachi), and the spear (yari). Initially, these weapons were not studied in separate arts. Rather, since the need was to prepare for battlefield combat, many different weapons and strategic and tactical skills were taught as part of comprehensive systems (sogo bujutsu).

[Read more...]