Oct
29

“Kote gaeshi: how to counter it,” by Dan Djurdjevic

“Introduction

Given that I’ve just analysed the application of kote gaeshi (wrist out turn throw/projection/lock) I thought I’d discuss methods of countering it. But before I do that I thought I’d first clarify what kote gaeshi is (in other words, the purpose of this technique).”

Click here to read entire article.

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Comments

  1. Tracy Reasoner says:

    Hence this is the exact reason Tohei Sensei changed Kotegaeshi to Koteoroshi because the technique is dropping straight down instead of reversing the wrist.

  2. Good article. Nice to thee thoughtful evaluation of techniques based on good practice.
    Thanks Dan, I enjoyed this one very much. In particular as Kotegaeshi is an old friend whose saved my life on a few occasions.

  3. Darned spellchecker thinks it knows better. I’ll try again.

    Good article. Nice to SEE AND READ thoughtful evaluation of techniques based on good practice.
    Thanks Dan, I enjoyed this one very much. In particular as Kotegaeshi is an old friend whose saved my life on a few occasions.

  4. Thanks Tracy and Nev.

    Yes Tracy, kote oroshi is not susceptible to the same escape.

    However it has its own issues. I can say this because I have trained in it quite extensively – as much as kote gaeshi.

    There are 2 “down” sides to kote oroshi as opposed to kote gaeshi:

    1. It does not have quite the same lever factor, hence it requires more force (albeit not a lot more, but still more) than kote gaeshi.

    2. It is, relative to kote gaeshi, more unstable, meaning that the uke has greater opportunity to push the elbow out and up to escape from the lock as it is being applied.

    Of course, there are ways to deal with this if it happens, and a well applied kote oroshi should avoid the escape, but the escape potential is still greater than the kote gaeshi, where the outward turn (gaeshi) prevents the elbow rolling up.

    We do many lock flows featuring kote oroshi that anticipate the “elbow raising” escape (even though you should practice to apply the lock properly and prevent the escape from occurring in the first place).

    Thanks for reading and for your comment.

  5. I forgot to say Nev:

    It’s great to hear that kote gaeshi has served you well. I have found the same thing. I think it is unfairly maligned by the MMA/sports combat crowd, when in fact I think it is very, very useful for civilian defence purposes.

    In short, it is an old friend of mine too (even if not everyone agrees with / likes my way of doing it!).

  6. Hi Dan,

    I appreciate your last comment. I think kotegashi may not be as effective when supine, but it’s a great technique when you have to stand up and survive. Especially hand held weapons.

    Keep well,

    Nev

  7. …kote gaeshi is an amazingly subtle technique, similar in that way but more difficult than shihonage, nikkyo and sankyo. first saw it demonstrated in its good form by Harvey Moskowitz. took me a number of years to get it about right. the way i now teach it is similar to shihonage. after getting to the hold, application is a curl of the hand into almost a fist, starting with the little finger and progressing to the first finger. the vortex of the rotation is best thought of as a descending spiral within the circumference visualized by the arm and shoulder. the focus of the vortex is roughly the apex of an equilateral triangle, the base of which is the forearm. give that some consideration. work in a very relaxed manner and see if a gentle application doesn’t soon affect posture and balance.

    countermeasures are numerous if the exact geometry isn’t achieved. irimi nage comes out in a number of them. kotegaeshi is not solely an aikido technique. most of the jiu jutsu forms seem intent on causing pain and possible local injury. as with most aikido techniques, the most probable injury in a strong, well applied technique is to the head when it hits the surface.

  8. “kotegaeshi is not solely an aikido technique”

    Indeed Charles. My own practice of “kote gaeshi” is from qin na. The Chinese just don’t have such neat naming conventions as the Japanese, so I’ll call it “kote gaeshi” just the same!

    Some excellent points.

  9. Dear Dan Durdevic:
    The application of Kote-gaeshi(wrist out turn throw),we have a lot of different Kote-gaeshi techniques like Katate-Dori Uchi(Uchi means inside or within), Ushiro Ryokata-Dori Kote-gaeshi(Ushiro-Mavari)(Mawari means turning around. Kote-gaeshi is a wrist bending techniques),Tsuki Kote-gaeshi(Tanto-Dori)taking advantage of his broken posture, bend his hand backward, Ushiro Tsuki Kote-gaeshi(tTanto-Dori)and they are very useful. We have come to develop the strong conviction that we will never be beaten by anyone no matter how strong. The Aikido is the best.
    I appreciate your last comment.
    Take care,
    Sincerely,
    Sensei/Shihan, 9th Dan, President of the American Aikido and United Martial Arts Federation, Fule Dogic

  10. Sensei/Shihan, 9th Dan,Only a 9th Dan,if you were a 10th…we would respect your opinion more.

  11. “We have come to develop the strong conviction that we will never be beaten by anyone no matter how strong. The Aikido is the best.”

    Is this for real?

  12. Interesting. In Iwama style we don’t relay on the twisting of the wrist, for exactly the reason stated above, some people just stand there and take it. With beginners it’s because they don’t know how to move to relieve the pain, but with some big fellas it’s because their wrist are basically too powerful for you to overcome with the leverage the hand bones give you.

    As well as using the wrist twist, we take the arm towards the rear third point. The shoulder joint reaches its maximum extension then locks the shoulder blade against the rib cage. This gives you direct leverage against their centre and the whole forearm becomes your lever.

    Daniel Toutain makes this point beautifully.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=32ixTwP0Sa4