Apr
11

“FIGHT SCIENCE: Moving into attacks,” by Chad Zoghby

“I was watching a show on National Geographic last night by the name of Fight Science. It’s basically a show which analyzes various martial arts to find how they work, their efficiency and also their pros and cons. In the one I saw, they brought in a Kung Fu master to demonstrate the use of chi.”

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Comments

  1. An intelligently moving target is safer.
    Interception is moving in conscious relationship to the energy of the attack. Sen-no-sen in boxing is known as “jamming.” Go-no-sen as “absorbing.” It’s as old as the world and nothing new.
    Everyone has “ki.” Most don’t realise it. It takes thirty seconds to get anyone at all to become conscious of their “ki” and to use it. Some people use “ki” for stage tricks and others to improve themselves.
    Stage tricks are just stage tricks. Bruce Lee made himself unpopular by showing them for what they are, by not playing to the stage props.

  2. bruce baker says:

    Why is it so hard to understand that you USE YOUR WHOLE BODY not just a piece of your body when find the most efficient use of technique?

    It in never just the extreme physical fitness of your body, or the extreme perception of the senses, or the calculating power of the mind, but all things in-harmony using the power of movement to achieve efficiency.

    The muscles ache, the body fails, and the audience and onlookers are amazed, as is the person demonstrating, but why is the only answer that anyone can come up with is… “ki”?

    I don’t know .. maybe .. walking on teacups without breaking them is a trick, and maybe it is as simple as overcoming the physical or mental training that is just the subliminal tricks those on stage use, but whatever training one uses .. there are .. tricks you will learn to deceive the eyes, fool the mind, trick your opponent’s body into pain and submission or feel injury. All types of training involve a particular set of tricks that take advantage of the nature of whatever situation or circumstances you are facing.

    It is up to you to learn how little or how much of your whole body you must use to achieve the technique that seems to be in harmony with the nature of circumstances or movements encountered … be gentle if you can .. huh?

    Learn to have a sensitivity that can feel how to dial up or dial back the use of all forces used to achieve all practiced techniques, as well as created movements in the heat of battle, so that you DO NO HARM.

    I think, that is my one gripe about so many people who practice Aikido, so many of them .. just never learn to reach out with their minds, use their entire physical body, or whatever senses they use to feel on many levels what amount of force is required or not required as they learn to use their whole body, and not just a limb, a hand, an arm, or a leg.. but to learn move their entire center from where all power of the human body comes from.

    If that is using the living forces of the universe both seen and unseen, and each force is a not a force but the mind’s attempt to transform it into a strange word alien word of “ki” .. fine.

    Don’t get me wrong, my annoyance of some words is because some people put weird meanings into certain words that just aren’t supposed to have those meanings people think they have. Reminds of that line in “The Princess Bride” when the events are “Inconceivable” and then the response is,”.. I do not think that word means what you think it means?” That is my take on when people say they are using their “ki”. I do NOT think that word means what you think it means.

    My point is.. if you are of a mind to .. watch a trick or technique long enough .. and you will figure out the components that make it work. Some of your Aikido is stage tricks transformed into fooling your opponent, but you will figure out how to transition into practical application with enough practice and get away from stage tricks as you learn the full range of forces needed to become a proficient practitioner of any martial art.

    Yep, Aikido practice will help just about anyone .. become a better practitioner of whatever martial art you decide to practice.

  3. I agree with most of what Bruce said. My students tell me that my strikes penetrate much deeper than those of others. Aikido has taught me to relax much better while striking as well as just simply moving and executing techniques.

  4. If you want to apply any power in a martial arts sense you have to apply Newton’s third law:
    “For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.”
    This is easiest to see and understand with a rocket. If you want the rocket to go straight up the most efficient way to do so is to have the exhaust go straight down. Because humans have brains, minds, shifting centers of gravity, changing weight distribution and mobile joints it can more difficult to ascertain what is happening. The opposite force can be at something other than 180degrees and still work efficiently or non-efficiently. In fact 2 fighters can do significantly different motions and still generate power obeying this law.

    The western boxer throws his cross, turns the torso, raises onto the same side toe and knocks you out. The wing chun puncher throws a punch along the center line, bends his knees, drops his weight, hollows the chest pushing back the central back. Both experienced punchers can cause some significant damage on the target. Both are pushing off the ground to get forward thrust power just like the rocket in essence obeying Newton’s third law. Unless they leaped into the punch (like a rocket taking off) neither puncher would be able to generate a decent punch if their feet were not on the ground. Just watch a clip of Bruce Lee or Hawkins Cheung throwing a 1 inch punch to see how much power can be generated by the effective application of this principle. It would behoove aikidoka’s to study this process and its application to aikido if they want to achieve power and handle larger opponents with minimal struggle. Of course it would be easier to just attribute any success to some unseen inexplicable force or just copy cat some “teacher” if that works for you. The question then is will you be able to reproduce that no matter who the opponent is and what he does.