Mar
31

FOR COLLECTORS ONLY: Limited number of copies of Stanley Pranin’s “Encyclopedia of Aikido” available!

While doing some reorganization the other day, we stumbled across 10 brand-new copies of Stanley Pranin’s Encyclopedia of Aikido first published in 1991. This book has been out of print for many years and is truly a collector’s item. We will be selling off these 10 copies on a first-come, first-served basis for a flat $75 per book. Each of these copies are personally autographed by the author.

If you would like to take advantage of this last chance to own a new, signed copy of the book, please click here.

To give you an idea of how readers have reacted to the work, we have excerpted a few comments about the book found on amazon.com:

“Author Stanley Pranin includes a huge variety of information in this encyclopedia on people in all different branches of Aikido and related arts, places of historical interest, specific events, different styles of aikido and their founders, and styles related to Aikido. Unfortunately, this volume has been out of print for some time…
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Mar
31

Brian Kagen pick: “Military Intelligence Corps Hall of Fame: Lt Colonel Richard M. Sakakida”

“Sakakida participated in the surrender by General Wainwright of Corregidor on May 7,1942 to General Homma of the Japanese Imperial Army. Sakakida provided all of the translations and negotiations of terms of surrender on behalf of General Wainwright. He was accosted by Japanese military personnel when he stood forthwright and declared that he was an American soldier and not a Filipino.After the surrender of Corregidor, he reverted to his undercover role. On November 18, 1942, Sakakida was taken to face court-martial charges that he was a traitor to Japan. Sakakida was questioned extensively by the Japanese concerning his status with the US Army , but he adhered to his original cover, insisting that he was a civilian interpreter working for the US and not a US soldier.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Mar
31

“Defense Through Awareness,” by Meghan Gardner

“Now don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying one should become paranoid. Simple AWARENESS is enough to forestall most attacks. Establishing small habits and breaking others can keep you from becoming a victim. Some examples are as follows:”

Click here to read entire article.

Mar
30

“Warm-up,” by Philippe Gouttard

“It seems important to me to give some thought to this important part of the practice in order to insure an injury and a frustration-free practice. What first comes to my mind is this: if we were to practice our art in another place than in the dojo, we would have to move fast and with energy without undergoing the process of preparing our body for action.”

Click here to read entire article.

Mar
29

“Wisdom,” by Gregor Erdmann

“Performing aikido purely as a sequence of physical movements will yield the practitioner little more than improved physical fitness. Most human endeavors do have an emotional or spiritual component to them, but to the martial artist who tries eek every ounce of efficiency from their being; this is taken to a higher level.”

Click here to read entire article.

Mar
28

Brian Kagen pick: “Proficiency and Aikido,” by Francis Takahashi from aikiweb.com

“Perhaps not quite common knowledge, but it is no secret that the Founder, and Aikikai Foundation, the organization developed by the late Doshu Kisshomaru Ueshiba, remained committed to maintaining appropriate and lasting relationships with most of the Founder’s students, past and current. Organizations such as the Yoshinkan (Gozo Shioda), Yoseikan (Minoru Mochizuki), Takemusu Aikido (Morihiro Saito), Nishio Aikido (Shoji Nishio), amongst others, retained positive and respectful ties to Aikikai Foundation, and still appear to do so today. In terms of legitimacy and genuineness of purpose, there never was, nor should there ever be, any need to “rank”, or otherwise categorize any individual or organization by any standard other than the unconditional allegiance to the principles of the Founder’s Aikido.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Mar
28

“Simple Self Defense,” by Captain Chris

“Real martial arts training can’t be rushed. Despite what instructors who work for black belt mills and McDojos say, it takes years to learn a martial art. It could take up to five years for a student to earn their black belt from a legitimate martial arts school, but you might not have that long. You aren’t going to live at the school until you’re ready for a street fight and thieves, rapists, and murders aren’t going to wait around until you know how to fight back. While martial arts training can take years to learn, the fundamentals of self defense don’t take very long at all – allowing you to have time to train in whatever style you enjoy.”

Click to read entire article.

Mar
27

“An Aikido Life,” by Gozo Shioda

“Since it was my long-cherished dream to embark on a great venture abroad, I began preparations to leave for my new post considering it an opportunity to try my fortunes as a man. I went to China alone in early May 1941. As soon as I arrived in Nanking I went to the house of the General Commander. General Hata was very hospitable and ordered an army civilian employee uniform for me. At that time, army civilian employees were classified by a badge indicating their class. I had no insignia in particular and was a “lord steward” without a crown. In those days my monthly salary was 100 yen. The value of money was much different from now and 100 yen would go a long way in those days. All of my meals were provided by the headquarters and I lived in an official residence. I hardly had to pay for anything. I used to treat the soldiers and drink with my comrades. I lived in easy circumstances. Though I was a private secretary, I had nothing to do. As Adjutant N. did most of the work I idled my time away all day long.”

The Aikido Journal archives now include more than 800 articles in twenty different languages and numerous video clips. We are constantly adding new articles and translations in our effort to document aikido and related disciplines past and present. If you would like to support us in this effort by taking out a subscription to the Online Aikido Journal we welcome you to do so by clicking this link. Remember that if you subscribe or renew for two years you will now receive the Aiki News / Aikido Journal Archival DVD absolutely free of charge. Don’t pass up this special offer!

Click here to read entire article.

Mar
27

“Training Safety and Control,” by Dennis Mahoney

“When I first started training in martial arts I was taught in all the systems I studied to move fast but stop my punch just before hitting my partner. This was done I was told for the dual purpose of training safety and teaching me control. I agree that it is safer but I’m not sure about the control benefits.”

Click here to read entire article.

Mar
26

“Aikido and Mind-Body Integration,” by Curtis L.V. Adams, M.D.

“The warrior must have a profound knowledge of his craft in order
to actualize a philosophy of saving his and his enemy’s life.”

In 1967, after four years in the General Practice of Medicine, I started a residency in Psychiatry. A large percentage of my general practice patients suffered from psychiatric conditions and I read psychiatric literature voraciously, as I did during my first year of residency. I became more and more mystified during that year, as we were presented so many systems of psychology and psychiatry, each of which, taken by itself, seemed to “make sense”. Taken together, those systems seemed conflicting and confusing. During a discussion of this confusion with my brother, then a graduate student in speech and communications, he suggested I learn about an epistemology called General Semantics. After I followed his suggestion, and applied Korzybski’s principles about abstracting to my studies, my confusion cleared remarkably. I enjoyed teaching those principles to students, residents, preceptees, patients, etc., over the years. It was always fun to see the comprehension bloom when I could get a student to sit long enough with a person overwhelmed, for instance, by a quandary without diagnosing or classifying so he could see the person and help him clarify his situation and arrive at a workable solution.
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Mar
26

“Aikido in the UK – The Beginning,” by Henry Ellis

“In 1951 at the age of 15 years I was just leaving school. I had already started a career at the age of 14yrs as a Time Trial racing cyclist, eventually becoming a club first team rider. At that time I could never imagine doing anything other than cycling and racing for the future. That was until early 1956, when I visited a local Judo club in the London suburb of Hillingdon, `The Abbe School of Budo` the only reason I went was to encourage my then girlfriends younger brother to join. I was instantly attracted to Judo and I joined that same evening, the young boy lasted for about one month. It was during the following year in 1957 that I saw the new Aikido class which was being taught by Ken Williams Sensei, who I later found to be the very first Aikido student in the UK of the legendary Budo master Kenshiro Abbe Sensei who was now resident in the UK.”

Click here to read entire article.

Mar
25

“You Are Entitled to Defend Yourself,” by Nev Sagiba

I recall, the one time I stood like a sack of potatoes and decided to do nothing, I sustained an injury. I recall clearly the policeman saying to me: “You are entitled to defend yourself.”

Obvious common sense.

What exactly is defence? Going into someone else’s home or country, all armed and pushing your weight around telling them how to live their lives? Not quite. Despite the fact politicians haven’t yet learned this basic and most expensive of all lessons, this obviously fails to achieve constructive results. Don’t think that the initiation of violent aggression is by any means a modern phenomenon. It’s as old as the world and has brought about the fall of each and every empire that thought it would solve their problems.

And still, there are those who just don’t get it. The initiation of acts of aggression will always have consequences, if not immediately, then eventually.

The other crime, mainly against yourself (or your nation) is the failure to effectively protect your perimeter. Or to fake this, such as in ‘false flag’ strategies used by despots, in order to manipulate otherwise peaceful minds to instigate and foment rage, in order to get otherwise reasonable people agree to risk wasting money in the initiation of aggression.
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