Feb
07

“Morihei Ueshiba, Founder of Aikido, Part 4,” by Kanemoto Sunadomaru

The article below has been selected from the extensive archives of the Online Aikido Journal. We believe that an informed readership with knowledge of the history, techniques and philosophy of aikido is essential to the growth of the art and its adherence to the principles espoused by Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba.

Morihei was in Engaru on business, staying at the Hisada ryokan (inn), when he happened to encounter Sokaku Takeda of Daito-ryu jujutsu, in what was to be a strange turn of the wheel of fortune. Morihei first heard of Sokaku Takeda from a sumo wrestler of ozeki rank he met at the Kitami pass en route to Asahikawa and with whom he stayed at an inn in Shirushibe.

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Feb
07

“The trap we fall into,” by Bruce Baker

How many times do you find people who say, Aikido has everything you need in a martial art? Obviously, looking at the history of aikido, and various training that the highest teachers of aikido practice might have experienced, this is not true. In their youth, all students try different martial arts, and gain a variety of skills, if not from training in martial arts, then from experiences of their life, and their everyday humdrum lives. Everything you do while being alive is some sort of training, more or less.

Training is the adaptation of techniques to a specific task. From the time your headlights come on as a child, and your memory clicks on, you have those memories the rest of your life until the time you die. You are continually adapting and training your body and mind to function in the world around you.
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Feb
06

“Fire and Water, The Balance,” by Nev Sagiba

This is possibly the most ancient of battles and it’s still raging. In a sense it’s not a battle at all, but a seeking of balance. However, by the time human beings appeared, it defined our existence from the core, and it still does.

Externally we can not live without either fire or water. Nor the earth and air. The planet is carbon based minerals surrounded by a thin later of air which modifies their changes, at the surface at least. The vast bulk of the planet is water. All this is cooled and heated by the cycles of the sun. These primaries, identified by the ancients as the original ancestors: fire, water, air and earth, are not entirely separate entities. The each exist in each other. They intersperse each other. At the surface, the atmosphere is about 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen, 1% other stuff (carbon dioxide, water vapour, argon, etc.); the oceans, water: 2 hydrogen, 1 oxygen; the solid crust, 62% oxygen (by number of atoms), 22% silicon, 6.5% aluminium, bits of iron, calcium, potassium, sodium, etc.

The ancients noticed this from day one; and our scientists are still analysing details. Some are lost in the details often drowning in too many details and miss the underlying principles. The great universe, put in the simplest way, sources these basics from the plenum which compose it, hydrogen, helium, carbon, nitrogen and so on. These originate from one.
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Feb
05

AJ Forum: “Proper Attack, ukemi and blocking questions”

“I cross train in karate and have a background in escrima. As a result, I frequently get chastised by the upper kyu and Dan Nages because:

1. they get offended because I block the strike, (block my face) while taking ukemi
2. throw a real punch (not hard, but a proper fist in the actual direction of the nage, without relenting. In other words, although I move slowly, if you don’t move, you will get hit). How can a person work on a technique when the attack is poor?

Can someone tell me why this is? I truly don’t get it.”

Click here to view entire thread.

Feb
05

Brian Kagen pick: “Aikikai Foundation”

“Aikido is a Budo (martial art) created by Morihei Ueshiba. After the Founder’s passing in 1969, his son Kisshomaru Ueshiba was inaugurated as Aikido Doshu. At present, Moriteru Ueshiba, grandson of the Founder, has succeeded his father as Aikido Doshu. The Aikikai Foundation, officially recognized by the Japanese government in 1940, was founded in order to preserve and promote the ideals of the true Aikido created by the Founder. As the Aikido World Headquarters, it is the parent organization for the development and expansion of Aikido throughout the world.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Feb
04

“The Black Belt, what Next?,” by Marcos Marcou

“There are martial artists every day who achieve their 1st Dan grade. This is usually the time where one is given the “magical black belt”. Does it all stop here? Is there more to do after this point, or can one quit, thinking to themselves that they are now masters of their art.”

Click here to read entire blog.

Feb
03

“The Triangle – The Human Body,” by Marc Abrams

“One of the salient points that I emphasise is that our bodies (spine) should ideally be centered between our two feet. This creates an equilateral triangle. This in an ideal position in which our bodies can receive and channel forces without having to compensate by moving our bodies. However, we sometimes look to create other types of triangles for specific purposes. The basic body movement in funakogi undo and ikkyo undo teaches us to shift our bodies forwards and backwards while learning how to equalize force as though our bodies are in an equilateral triangle position.”

Click here to read entire blog.

Feb
02

Brian Kagen pick: “Grab my wrist; no, really!”, by Christopher Hein

“So why would anyone grab your wrist? Maybe they grab your wrist to pull you somewhere, or to put you in something. While some Aikido techniques may come in handy for this, usually it’s not important to the attacker that he be grabbing your wrist in these situations. He could just as likely be grabbing your hair, shirt, leg or whatever he can easily grab in order to drag you off to where he wants you. Aikido does have grabs from other place’s like collar and cuff, but wrist grabbing are heavily emphasized in Aikido forms.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Feb
01

“My Early Days in Aikido,” by Stanley Pranin

“All the teenagers present, myself included, were captivated by the marvelous display of dynamic techniques replete with joint-locks and spectacular falls the likes of which they had never before witnessed. Since I regarded myself as rather weak physically, this strange oriental fighting art instantly captivated my imagination and visions of an all-powerful warrior (me!) repelling multiple attackers with the mere flick of a wrist lept tantalizingly into my mind. More than just casually interested in this mysterious art, several days later I went with a few equally curious schoolmates to the nearby dojo where aikido was practiced for a first-hand look.”

The Aikido Journal archives now include more than 800 articles in twenty different languages and numerous video clips. We are constantly adding new articles and translations in our effort to document aikido and related disciplines past and present. If you would like to support us in this effort by taking out a subscription to the Online Aikido Journal we welcome you to do so by clicking this link. Remember that if you subscribe or renew for two years you will now receive the Aiki News / Aikido Journal Archival DVD absolutely free of charge. Don’t pass up this special offer!

Click here to read entire article.

Feb
01

Brian Kagen pick: “Bartitsu – the Lost Martial Art of Sherlock Holmes”

“A preview trailer for the upcoming documentary exploring the cultural history, rediscovery and modern revival of E.W. Barton-Wright’s “New Art of Self Defence”. Founded in London in 1899, Bartitsu was an early example of a mixed martial art, combining boxing, jiujitsu, savate and self defence with a walking stick. After a brief heyday, it was all but forgotten throughout the 20th century except for a single cryptic reference in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes story, “The Adventure of the Empty House.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read video.