Feb
15

Brian Kagen pick: “The Two Faces of Combatives,” by Hunter B. Armstrong

“From the hoplological perspective, we clearly distinguish two primary types of combative systems, (fighting arts). As raised several times over the years in HOPLOS, and most recently in Donn Draeger’s article, “Understanding East Asian Combative Culture,”1 martial and civil fighting are two areas of combative behavior that have evolved for different applications under stimulus from different combative contexts. More importantly, however, I intend to show that their distinctions are based in biological adaptations though certainly influenced by cultural mechanisms.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Feb
14

Brian Kagen pick: “Gordon Warner,” by Leiv Harstad

“Often when an individual thinks of influential characters in kendo, more likely than not, that individual will think of Japanese kenshi like Mochida Moriji or Takano Sasaburo, or even present day heroes like Eiga or Miyazaki (rightfully so as these people have left a tremendous mark). However, few would think of an American named Dr Gordon Warner. Little information is readily available about Dr Warner and therefore his contributions go unnoticed for the most part. Dr Warner was a pioneer and is largely responsible for bridging the western world to Japanese kendo”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Feb
13

“More Advice For Beginners,” by Nev Sagiba

Many people forget what it was like to start for the very first time.

So many people would like to make a start, but out of either fear, timidity, unsureness, or a list of other reasons, never do.

If you made it past the wishing and hoping and perhaps occasionally enquiring, and have got as far as actually finding and visiting a dojo; CONGRATULATIONS!

That was the first test, “Grasshopper!” Your warrior spirit is showing! Make no mistake about it, whatever anybody says. Any Budo is a warrior yoga not to be taken lightly.
[Read more...]

Feb
12

Brian Kagen pick: “Donn Draeger,” by Mike Belzer

“Most people involved with the study of fighting arts are familiar with the name Donn Draeger . For some, they only knew him as ‘that guy who wrote all those martial art books’. To others he was one of the most highly trained, knowledgeable and experienced professional warriors they ever met. Through out his life he focused his energies on the fighting arts. In fact, Donn Draeger became known as the founder of modern hoplology.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Feb
12

“Everything in Black and White” by David Lynch

The article below has been selected from the extensive archives of the Online Aikido Journal. We believe that an informed readership with knowledge of the history, techniques and philosophy of aikido is essential to the growth of the art and its adherence to the principles espoused by Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba.

Our dojo scored a world-first the other day when two high-ranking Japanese senseis conducted a class wearing ordinary street clothes, while all the students wore dogi and hakama!… This drastic deviation in dress code came about because the senseis were here on holiday and had not intended to train. I persuaded them to take the class at the last moment and there was no time to arrange uniforms for them.

[Read more...]

Feb
11

“Aikido Koan,” by Nick Lowry

zen-koan
http://www.aikidojournal.com/blog/media/lowry.jpg

“Be patient and hold your mind in the practice of inhabiting the circle in all your aikido.”

Simple ink on paper, three figures in a line. Circle. Square. Triangle.

Terry Dobson once asked O Sensei to tell him what the circle, square, and triangle meant in aikido. The master told him to figure it out for himself. I love that, it’s Beautiful.

This is how zen koans work. The answers you arrive at must come from you, must be really yours, not something somebody else has said. They must be authentic expressions of your lived experience, of the living energy of the question interacting with your own experience. They must really be authentic, and if a teacher rolls out his or her understanding too readily, too often, his generosity and helpfulness may displace the student’s work. Too forthcoming, he may actually weaken the learning process, and he may build dependancy and laziness, under the guise of teaching. Such a teacher may wind up with lots of followers and few real students.
[Read more...]

Feb
09

Featured forum thread: “How to become a part of an aikido federation”

“Usually things work the other way around. First there is a relationship to a teacher, maybe to the teacher’s teacher and then naturally one joins the group of those people. If for whatever reason that relationship, that lineage, is broken, the dojo responsibles will first have to look for a sponsor, a sensei, a shihan who they can respect, who’s training they like and benefit from. Then they can join that person’s group and find a home for their rankings.”

Click here to view forum thread.

Feb
09

Cartoon: “Dinner Aikido,” by Shawn Shipp

“Discussing Aikido during dinner using props…”

“So the salt and pepper packets are the feet… the toothpicks are the jo and… wait, where did I loose you?

Feb
09

“An Aikido Life, Part 5,” by Gozo Shioda

“[Y]ou should never lose a sense of humility as a practitioner even in the presence of a beginner. Imagine that a beginner enters the dojo. This person, of course, doesn’t know anything about Aikido, which means he is completely pure. Since he is pure he may have some good points which you don’t have or you may realize your bad points through him. Therefore, a sense of humility where you consider a person who enters your dojo for the first time as your instructor is required.”

The Aikido Journal archives now include more than 800 articles in twenty different languages and numerous video clips. We are constantly adding new articles and translations in our effort to document aikido and related disciplines past and present. If you would like to support us in this effort by taking out a subscription to the Online Aikido Journal we welcome you to do so by clicking this link. Remember that if you subscribe or renew for two years you will now receive the Aiki News / Aikido Journal Archival DVD absolutely free of charge. Don’t pass up this special offer!

Click here to read entire article.

Feb
08

Brian Kagen pick: “Wristlock, a bit of a misnomer…,” by Christopher Hein

“The idea of the wristlock is to use these physical devices to control a person. This is done either through pain compliance or by locking the joint directly, linking to the subjects core, and physically controlling him . While many of Aikido’s wrist techniques do have some application in this area; thinking of them simply as wristlocks seriously limits their true potential.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Feb
08

Recommended reading: “Character Counts!” by Stanley Pranin

The article below has been selected from the extensive archives of the Online Aikido Journal. We believe that an informed readership with knowledge of the history, techniques and philosophy of aikido is essential to the growth of the art and its adherence to the principles espoused by Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba.

Aikido bills itself, so to speak, as a martial art with a spiritual core. That is, beyond self-defense skills, aikido promises its followers a path through which they may “polish” their spirits in order to become better people. Doshu Kisshomaru Ueshiba even goes so far as to state that the main relevance of aikido in modern society is as a vehicle for developing better members of society more so than as a martial art, If one accepts this view–as I have come to over the years–then the character, integrity, and conduct of individuals, rather than their level of technical mastery, become the true measure of their stature in the art.

[Read more...]

Feb
07

“Aikido Pioneers-Prewar Era” cover: A community effort!

A NEW WAY TO DESIGN A BOOK COVER!

We are very pleased to have launched our latest book titled Aikido Pioneers-Prewar Era by Stanley Pranin. We feel that one of the most attractive points of the new book–apart from its wonderful content–is the lovely cover that graces this volume. The cover is the creation of a talented designer from Portugal named João Tinoco. When he first contacted us, João submitted several links to examples of his work. Needless to say, we were duly impressed. Here are some of them…

Stamps
Bookcovers
Logo
Poster 1
Poster 2

Congratulations João!

Click here to order the new book.

Click here to view or download (right click) a sample PDF file of the book
[Read more...]