Feb
22

Brian Kagen pick: “Beverly master Bernie Mulligan reaches highest rank in Aikido,” by Terry Weber

“Ask some people how they envision their life at 82, and some say they hope to accomplish their life’s goals long before that, or they mention senior centers and nursing homes. Not so for Bernie Mulligan of Salem. Last week, Mulligan reached the highest level of achievement in Aikido, a Japanese martial art. Mulligan, 82, was designated as “Shihan” or Master Teacher from Aikido World Headquarters in Tokyo.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Feb
21

“What is Low Tech Combat?,” from lowtechcombat.com

“Firstly, high tech combat is modern warfare. This involves combined arms battle groups, satellite communications, automatic weapons, aircraft carrier battle groups and manoeuvre warfare. This is warfare utilising modern technology. It is warfare waged by states. It is the methods and tactics used against the Taliban in the mountains of Afghanistan.

In comparison, low tech combat is combat using low tech, or no technology. It is up close and personal. It can be unarmed combat or it can utilise basic impact weapons such as a stick or marble ash tray. It can be combat using edged weapons such as a knife or screwdriver. It can be one on one or one against many. It can be a combination of the above. It is the combat engaged in on the streets and in homes around the world.”

Click here to read entire article.

Feb
20

“Sending Ki In Advance,” by Shinichi Tohei

“‘In fact, with only a small effort, we can handle the jobs easily. That is, ‘to send Ki to all the things to do in advance’. The job to which we direct our Ki willingly is not tiring, however, the one which we feel we need to do because we are told to do so and to which our Ki is not directed, is very tiring. This is the difference between ‘Ki goes in advance of doing the jobs’ and ‘“Do the jobs and Ki comes later.’ Even if the time difference of Ki is only an instant, it causes a very big difference.”

Click here to read entire blog.

Feb
20

“There Is No Such Thing As A Wrong Attack,” by Nev Sagiba

The customer is always right. If you want his money that is.

The attacker is always right. At least she will believe so.

The salient feature of Aikido is that it does not evaluate, but harmonizes everything that is thrown at it. Well, real Aikido, I don’t know about pseudo-budo.

When you evaluate the “rightness” or the “wrongness” of an attack, you become entangled in the attacker’s unwell, or inventive attacking mindset of conflict, instead of simply dealing with the actuality at hand. Ideas and opinions don’t win fights. Good responses do. Conflict is merely a reflection of the torment the attacker carries in his mind. Adding to it is like adding petrol to fire. Explosive.
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Feb
19

“Aikido Beginners: Hints & Tips” from JaseOnAikido

“When we first start training aikido it can all seem a bit overwhelming. There’s a lot to take on board & our minds are a little overloaded. Hopefully, these hints & tips will help to clarify things by removing some of the ‘noise’ (excessive thoughts & superfluous movements) that can distract you when training in the dojo.”

Click here to read entire article.

Feb
19

Brian Kagen pick: “Defensive vs Protective: A Matter of Mindset,” by Hunter B. Armstrong

“The word mindset is often bandied about in combative training, though it doesn’t seem to be easily defined nor well applied in practice. We prefer the term combative intent. While most people who use the term mindset seem to be referring to a “correct” mindset, inherently the word itself is basically neutral: one can either a positive mindset or a negative mindset. Combative intent, however, implies the will or volition to carry out a combative action. Nevertheless, whether using the word mindset or intent, a rose by another name is just as sweet…”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Feb
18

“Body Ego and Brain Ego,” by Ralph Pettman

“In mental terms aikido means “letting go”, not relying on physical strength, not depending on the intellectual part of the brain to think of solutions to the problems we face. These are not little things to let go. The thinking part of the brain always wants to tell us that the intellect matters most. It will use that sense of the body that uses out muscles to stay in control.”

Click here to read entire blog.

Feb
18

“An Aikido Life – Part 6,” by Gozo Shioda

“My father was interested from an early stage in educating young people and remodeled one corner of the house into a dojo since his idea was that martial arts were the only means to achieve this purpose. He called the dojo the “Yoshinkan”. This was the predecessor of the Yoshinkan we have today.”

The Aikido Journal archives now include more than 800 articles in twenty different languages and numerous video clips. We are constantly adding new articles and translations in our effort to document aikido and related disciplines past and present. If you would like to support us in this effort by taking out a subscription to the Online Aikido Journal we welcome you to do so by clicking this link. Remember that if you subscribe or renew for two years you will now receive the Aiki News / Aikido Journal Archival DVD absolutely free of charge. Don’t pass up this special offer!

Click here to read entire article.

Feb
17

Brian Kagen pick: “Interview with John Stevens,” by Cheryl Matrasko

“John Stevens is an internationally acclaimed Aikidoka and one of the foremost authorities on Aikido and Buddhist studies. He is the author many famous books of Aikido which are available in many different translations. He is a respected member of academia, a professor at Tohoku Fukushi University, in Sendai, Japan (just north of Tokyo, on the east coast). I have always found his literary works interesting, thought provoking, and very educational in the study of Aikido and other cultures as well.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Feb
16

“Aikido and the Individualistic West,” by Drew Gardner

I learned in twelfth grade psychology class that the major cultural difference between East and West is collectivism versus individualism. Although I have not traveled beyond the United States and its nearby protectorates, befriending Asian people has reinforced what my psychology teacher and accompanying textbook taught.

There is a tendency in the East, including Aikido’s homeland of Japan, to accomplish what is best for the group. This group may be limited to immediate peers, or branch out to an individual’s entire corporation or organization. It may even become national or encompass the perceived entire world.
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Feb
16

Brian Kagen pick: “Aiki Push Hands (with video),” by Jake McKee

“One of the challenges that all Aikido teachers face is how to get students to stop relying on brute strength to move their partners. It was this challenge that led me to develop an exercise that I call “Aiki Push Hands“.

In this exercise both partners place their hands together and try to push each other over. It is exactly this kind of training that shows how reliance on muscular strength will not bring you to your goal.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read blog and view video clip.

Feb
15

“Morihei Ueshiba, Founder Of Aikido – Part 5,” by Kanemoto Sunadomari

The article below has been selected from the extensive archives of the Online Aikido Journal. We believe that an informed readership with knowledge of the history, techniques and philosophy of aikido is essential to the growth of the art and its adherence to the principles espoused by Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba.

Morihei made the decision to change trains at Kyoto for Ayabe. He met Onisaburo Deguchi and requested that he pray for his father’s recovery from his illness. However, Onisaburo told Morihei that his father was “alright as he was”. Morihei later understood the meaning of these words to be that his father had lived out his natural life. He stayed at the Omoto Headquarters for several days and returned to Tanabe only to find that his father had already passed away.

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