Feb
28

“Risk Management,” by Gregor Erdmann

“In a combat situation one obviously does not have much time to analyze a risk, so it pays to become familiar with the process of dealing with risk. When one considers some common risks we can see a correlation between the amount we risk, and the probability of it happening. Then tendency is that by risking more, the probability of that risk occurring is reduced.”

Click here to read entire article.

Feb
28

Featured forum thread: “Impressions of Kagami Biraki by Edgar Bull (from Brazil) “

“With so many prestigious Aikido masters, there surrounding Doshu, some which I knew by photos and films, I could understand clearly that the Aikikai is not just an organization created to teach a martial arts of way of life, but it is also the center of a big international family where one can find friendship, union, commitment and harmony between the members and I felt very proud and happy to be part of it.”

Click here to view forum thread.

Feb
27

“In Memory of Kuroiwa Yoshio – 黒岩洋志郎 — 1932- 2010,” by Ellis Amdur

“Kuroiwa Yoshio was a unique figure within the Aikikai. Although one of the senior postwar shihan, he refused rank past sixth dan. In fact, he simply refused rank all the way up the ladder until Ueshiba Kisshomaru (Nidai Doshu) personally requested that he accept a sixth dan, because dispatching him to teach in dojos without any rank was getting embarrassing. Kuroiwa was provocative, almost rebellious, but he remained within the organization — functioning at times like a grain of sand underneath an otherwise smooth mantle, but otherwise, largely ignored. He was technically original, with an utterly unique style of movement. Had he been a different man, and perhaps, if his health had been better, he could have started his own aikido group independently, like Shioda or Tomiki. Instead, he remained within the fold – but just barely.”

Click here to read entire article.

Feb
27

“Morihei Ueshiba, Founder of Aikido, Part 6″ by Kanemoto Sunadomari

The article below has been selected from the extensive archives of the Online Aikido Journal. We believe that an informed readership with knowledge of the history, techniques and philosophy of aikido is essential to the growth of the art and its adherence to the principles espoused by Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba.

Returning to the original subject, Morihei, thinking he had something to learn from the Omoto religion, moved to Ayabe with his entire family. They settled down in a house surrounded by a bamboo thicket and the base of Mt. Hongu. This was a lonely place where foxes and raccoons were often seen in those days. Turning left from there around the base of Mt. Hongu was the Omoto headquarters.

[Read more...]

Feb
26

“The Physics Of Forces In Aikido: Making The Weak Equal To The Strong,” by Daniel James

“As in much of aikido, your opponent actually throws himself. He cannot prevent your forward motion because of the unstable posture in which you initially place him. Even if he has superior body weight, he cannot stop the motion by pulling downward on your raised wrists. In such a position he can pull only along the length of your arms. The torque due to such a pull is zero because there is no ‘lever’ (described in Part I in this series, ‘The Physics Of Forces In Judo: Making The Weak Equal To The Strong’).”

Click here to read entire article

Feb
26

Recommended reading: “Kannagara No Jutsu (The Art of Shinto)” by Morihei Ueshiba

The article below whose authorship is attributed to Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba has been selected from the extensive archives of the Online Aikido Journal. We believe that an informed readership with knowledge of the history, techniques and philosophy of aikido is essential to the growth of the art and its adherence to the principles espoused by Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba.

The authentic core of Japanese bujutsu must remain in its progressiveness. The Universe is continually advancing and in that same truth bujutsu must also move forward. Advancing is always a safe course but if you retreat you will be cut by the enemy. Therefore, we see that Japanese budo is performed through advancing and unifying all things into Goodness. Bujutsu must be in accordance with the rotation of the heavens and the earth. The human body is a miniature universe, a small version of the cosmos. If you want to train in bujutsu unify your spirit. The body is trained according to the “Way” exactly as the spirit thinks and so we are able to unify the body as well.

[Read more...]

Feb
25

“Morihei Ueshiba Wasn’t “Doing Aikido”,” by Nev Sagiba

This may come as a surprise but Morihei Ueshiba never, “Did Aikido.” What he did “do” was to synchretise everything available, all Budo, to efficient action, the ergonomics of combat interaction, if you will. And to act appropriately for any given moment, no two moments being the same.

That he named this, “Aikido” following several other labels, takes nothing away from the sheer genius of his approach.

If we are going to do something, let’s do it well by taking away the forcing, the clumsiness and inefficient movement. This requires clarity. A great deal of it.
[Read more...]

Feb
25

“Why Budo are not supposed to work in a real fight,” by Guillaume Erard

“As an Aikido instructor and lifelong martial arts practitioner, I often had to explain what this discipline was about; in particular, what made it different from other arts such as Judo, Karatedo or Kendo. I started realizing that a more productive way to proceed might in fact be to explain what these Budo had in common rather than pointing out what separated them. It is especially important if we want to understand the difference between Budo and Bujutsu (武術).”

Click here to read entire article.

Feb
24

From AJ forum: Iaido in Iwama

“I was uchideshi this year again for one month (tooooo short) and had the opportunity to learn Battojutsu directly from [Hitohiro Saito] Sensei. First, Sensei handed us the Iaito (the Tanrenkan has several) and told me, as the highest grade present, to practice suburi, and kumitachi. Since I did not know anything about it, I had to depend on Kasper (an excellent long time sotodeshi), and another day on Yasuhiro Saito, to teach me the Sekiguchi Ryu. About a week later, Sensei taught us directly with many details. It was a wonderful class. Sekiguchi Ryu is a ryu originally from Wakayama (O’Sensei’s country). It is a vigorous style with lots of kiai. We also practiced with live blades using some excellent swords that Sensei has.

One site where you can have a look at this Battojutsu style is located here.

It seems that Sensei has had a long connection with this style.”

Tristão da Cunha from Portugal

Click here to view forum thread.

Feb
24

Hiroshi Isoyama Shihan in Texas in June

On June 12th, Hiroshi Isoyama Shihan will be visiting Southlake, Texas where he will be the leading instructor at an Aikido seminar. Isoyama Shihan currently holds an 8th Dan within the Aikikai and is the Chief Instructor at the Ibaraki Shibu Dojo in Iwama, Japan on behalf of Ueshiba Moriteru Doshu.

Isoyama Shihan started his career in Aikido at the age of 12 as a student of Ueshiba Morihei O-Sensei, the founder of Aikido. During his long career in the martial arts, Isoyama Shihan has been the Chief Instructor of Defensive Tactics for the Japan Self Defense Force Academy, and has been an instructor to the U.S. Army on self defense tactics. Some of his first students were members of the American Military Police, and eventually included amongst others, Steven Seagal Sensei, as well as members of Japan’s armed forces.

For more information about this event please visit www.isoyamaseminar.com.

Feb
23

“Freestyle,” by David Shevitz

“Hover around a group of students who are fast approaching their brown or black belt tests, and you’ll find that one topic routinely dominates the conversation: freestyle. And to be sure, there is something about sitting down, exhausted from the technique portion of your test, facing off against 3, 4 or 5 skilled ukes, each of whom presumably is there for one purpose: to take you down, that makes you think…”

Click here to read entire article.

Feb
22

“The Psychology of Life and Death,” by Jeff Dooley

Sometimes when I see people doing the 31 kumijo partner practice I get the impression that they are moving through a sequence of dance steps, memorized and practiced until they become automatic. Often it looks smooth and coordinated, as if each person knows what their partner is going to do next, which of course they do.

Click here to read entire article.