Nov
30

Add your book review to the world’s largest aikido bibliography!

We would like to point out the available of book summaries and scans for books in our bibliography database.

Click here to see a complete list of books in our database. Among the many features added to the bibliography section is a book review capability replete with a star-rating system.

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Nov
29

Brian Kagen pick: “Tsubaki Grand Shrine of America”

“Thank you for visiting the website of Tsubaki Grand Shrine of America. Located on a pristine 25 acre site near Seattle, WA (by car – by bus), Tsubaki Grand Shrine of America is the traditional Jinja Shinto Shrine and the direct North American branch of Tsubaki O Kami Yashiro in Mie Prefecture one of the oldest and most prestigious shrines in Japan with a history of over 2000 years.

Originating in Japan’s prehistory, Shinto is the Natural Spirituality or the practice of the philosophy of proceeding in harmony with and gratitude to Divine Nature.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Nov
29

Recommended reading: “Morihei Ueshiba, Founder Of Aikido (08)” by Kanemoto Sunadomari

The article below has been selected from the extensive archives of the Online Aikido Journal. We believe that an informed readership with knowledge of the history, techniques and philosophy of aikido is essential to the growth of the art and its adherence to the principles espoused by Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba.

I have described the circumstances of how Morihei and his family moved to Ayabe from Hokkaido in the previous chapter. The area at the foot of Mt. Mountain where Morihei’s house was located was quite different from the newly developed land in Shirataki in Hokkaido where the air was full of wild vigor. His new shrubbery-fronted house was in very quiet surroundings. Although Morihei had conquered the wilderness of Hokkaido by cultivating the land, he still was not satisfied. His search for spiritual nourishment led him to the Omoto religion.

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Nov
27

Brian Kagen pick: “Aikido Online Introduction”

“These Shihan, most of whom were uchi deshi (live-in disciples) of O-Sensei Morihei Ueshiba, were in close contact with him during the height of his creative development of Aikido. They studied and trained under his direction and in the company of many of the greatest exponents of the art, including Doshu Kisshomaru Ueshiba, Kisaburo Osawa, Hiroshi Tada, Sadateru Arikawa and Seigo Yamaguchi Senseis.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Nov
25

“Forward Movement – A Natural Part of Life,” by Nev Sagiba

Error is a natural part of life. It is designed to be the starting point of the learning curve. Mistakes are lessons and, as there is nothing that cannot be improved and refined further, the best way to enable forward movement is to acknowledge and let go.

In this way the lessons of the past became stepping-stones and enable adaptive transformation that leads to improved modes of operation and refined function.

Paring away clutter enables the lightness of forward movement. All correction does. Be it writing edition, improving the next new model car, correcting character traits or training.
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Nov
24

Brian Kagen pick: “Kiai Jutsu: The Shout Used As A Weapon,” by Christopher Caile

“One famous martial arts teacher who seemed to demonstrate the power of kiai repeatedly was Morihei Ueshiba, the founder of aikido.In one video which shows him doing techniques in the latter part of his life, there is a sequence in which an attacker is literally blown back off his feet by a kiai uttered by Ueshiba. Is this a demonstration of real power or just the reaction of an apprehensive student all too willing to follow his teacher’s lead? Actually, I believe it is the former. My aikido teacher, Roy Suenaka Sensei, who studied with Ueshiba in Tokyo, recounted to me an experience that happened around 1961.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Nov
24

Recommended reading: “Solo Training – Why Iai?” by Ellis Amdur

The article below has been selected from the extensive archives of the Online Aikido Journal. We believe that an informed readership with knowledge of the history, techniques and philosophy of aikido is essential to the growth of the art and its adherence to the principles espoused by Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba.

Some practitioners of modern martial arts deride kata training, claiming that an adherence to form is inherently weak. They claim that one trains stereotyped responses by rote and repetition, thereby rendering oneself unable to respond with freedom to an unpredictable, random attack. On the other hand, one’s freedom is limited by one’s neurological organization — stereotypical patterns of action and reaction entrained through another type of kata training — the repetitive, habitual patterns of movement one arrives at simply by living. Proper kata training is, in fact, a means of teaching one’s nervous system new patterns of response.

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Nov
23

Brian Kagen pick: “The forgotten story of … Muhammad Ali v Antonio Inoki”

“Why fight a wrestler and demean the boxing title in many people’s eyes, Ali was asked. If his stated plan to retire at the end of the year was true, his answer was understandable. ‘Six million dollars, that’s why,’ the champion replied.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Nov
23

Recommended reading: “Remarkable Japanese (13): The Birth of Aikido” by Kazuhiko Ikeda

The article below on the early days of aikido and its founder Morihei Ueshiba has been selected from the extensive archives of the Online Aikido Journal. We believe that an informed readership with knowledge of the history, techniques and philosophy of aikido is essential to the growth of the art and its adherence to the principles espoused by Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba.

During that period O-Sensei was greatly influenced by Deguchi in religious matters and integrated this perspective into his martial art-oriented mind. Nevertheless, this is not to say that Ueshiba embraced the Omoto doctrine wholeheartedly, but rather that the thoughts expressed by Deguchi stimulated a religious sentiment in Ueshiba.

The Aikido Journal archives now include more than 800 articles in twenty different languages and numerous video clips. We are constantly adding new articles and translations in our effort to document aikido and related disciplines past and present. If you would like to support us in this effort by taking out a subscription to the Online Aikido Journal we welcome you to do so by clicking this link. Remember that if you subscribe or renew for two years you will now receive the Aiki News / Aikido Journal Archival DVD absolutely free of charge. Don’t pass up this special offer!

Click here to read entire article.

Nov
22

Video clips of Seigo Yamaguchi in AJ archives

Seigo Yamaguchi Sensei (1924-1996) was one of the most prominent of the postwar generation of aikido instructors of the Aikikai Hombu Dojo. Yamaguchi Sensei’s aikido was totally unique and he had many followers the world over and was especially popular in France. Unfortunately, he did not leave any books or commercial videotapes so little information is available about him. A viewing of the video clips on this website will give you an idea of how his aikido looked and why he was so highly regarded by all who had an opportunity to train with him.

Seigo Yamaguchi at 1993 All-Japan Aikido Demonstration
Seigo Yamaguchi at 1983 All-Japan Aikido Demonstration
Seigo Yamaguchi at Aikikai Hombu Dojo, 1973 – Part 1
Seigo Yamaguchi at Aikikai Hombu Dojo, 1973 – Part 2
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Nov
21

Brian Kagen pick: “Keiko Shokon,” by Diane Skoss

“Training in the classical martial arts takes place within the context of a time-honored and very Japanese social structure that has at its center the transmission of tradition. These arts can be thought of as living history, preserving principles of combat and details of etiquette of an era long past. Yet they also serve a multitude of purposes in our modern world, ranging from “spiritual forging” to the cultivation of skills that are practical despite the archaic weapons employed. It comes as no surprise, then, that growing numbers of Westerners are becoming interested in these ancient Japanese arts.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Nov
20

“A Window into your life,” by Gregor Erdmann

“Under the duress of training, we are often able to see aspects of our lives which remain hidden from us while we go about our day to day activities. In a way, aikido is a window to our souls.

Your sensei may gain insights into your personality and give you constructive feedback which can lead to marvellous inroads to resolving issues you may be facing work and home.”

Click here to read entire blog.