Oct
16

Brian Kagen pick: “TMA v Modern systems”

“I still remember my first night there where the assistant instructor took me to the rear of the class and taught me how to make a fist, what knuckles to hit with and that my wrist and fist should be in line which makes it stronger to strike with. I loved it! I was learning how to defend myself!”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

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Comments

  1. Were are your students going…check out your local MMA gym…sorry.. but it’s true in my town.

  2. The problem with the modern fighting arts, as I see it, is they are expensive. You wear out your body too fast. Nor do you get a whole lot more realism. Yes, there are matches, but those have their own level of artificiality. I’ve become an aikido person. Anybody, including me, can lose a fight. Years of repetitive forms, though, have given me some advantage in hand-to-hand situations. Having once perceived the threat, I can go into it at the strategic level, knowing that my hands, feet, and so on, will take care of themselves as trained.

  3. I think MMA is best thought of as a base to work from. No it is not like the street. But it is an excellent platform from which to build on. One learns how the body reacts and people instinctively defend themselves under pressure. This is useful. From that ‘Alive’ base, further time can be spent refining technique or studying indicators which could warn of an imminent attack…

    Happy Training

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