Oct
31

Brian Kagen pick: “Six tips – How to learn a martial art…” by Dunken Francis

“One excellent example was Dr. Jigoro Kano, Founder of Kodokan Judo. He was also a very famous educator in Japanese Society. Many of the technical aspects and the resulting methods of teaching (as well as the taxonomy of techniques) of Kodokan Judo are a direct result of Dr. Kano’s understanding of the ‘Steps’ in the “Learning Process”. Many Martial Arts Sensei have often pointed out that before you can defend yourself with appropriate techniques, you must first ‘know your Martial Art’.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Oct
30

“The Paradox of Aikido – Myriad Potentials” by Nev Sagiba

When is a martial art not a martial art?

When it’s Aikido!

Contest sports contain little, if any truly martial skill that would be useful in a battlefield. Their brawling methods exist to keep people entertained. And injured.

And yet, nearly all these, once formed part of a comprehensive survival toolkit either for the killing fields or for day to day survival as hunter gathering societies, many with unruly neighbours.

In today’s world we are not warring farmers and no longer grow up working from an early age. Our “work” usual consists of lots of sitting down and inordinate efforts spent to avoid real work, of the sweaty muscular kind. The most wear and tear we now get is RSI from wielding a mouse and keyboard as we become blind.
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Oct
30

Brian Kagen pick: “The Student’s Guide to Surviving a Traditional Dojo”

“Every dojo has its own way of operating, but over the years I have found certain foundational concepts that lead practitioners to success and longevity in their training. I have also noticed some very common pitfalls that trap students in ways they never saw coming. It is my goal with this ebook to give students of all ages and ranks a deeper understanding of how to prosper in their chosen art.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Oct
29

Brian Kagen pick: “Keiko Fukuda, Judo Master, Visits Ukiah Aikido” by Janet Rosen

“The visitor was Keiko Fukuda. The highest ranked woman in judo, with a 9th degree black belt, at 96 Fukuda is a still active and vital link to both the roots of judo and Japan’s samurai era. Her grandfather, Hachinosuke Fukuda, was an instructor of Tenjin Shinyo-ryu Jujutsu. One of his students was Jigoro Kano, the founder of judo; the elder Fukuda was a mentor to Kano and there are Tenjin Shinyo-ryu movements in some of the kata developed by Kano.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Oct
28

“Interview with Dunken Francis of the Institute of Aikido Auckland”

“The dojo I “grew up in” in the UK was the Hut dojo in London. I started there aged 10 back in 1974 under sensei H W Foster 7th dan, who is still teaching there today at the age of 84, and is the technical director of the Institute of Aikido worldwide. Sensei Foster was one of the original students of Kenshiro Abbe Sensei back in the late 1950’s, and the Hut dojo was the birthplace of Aikido in the UK.”

Click here to read entire interview.

Oct
27

Brian Kagen pick: “Nicklaus Suino, Author and 7th Dan Iaido (Part 1)” by Matthew

“When I was eight years old, my parents took me to watch a judo demonstration at the Ann Arbor Y. I was enthralled. Over 40 years later, I remember the demonstration as if it happened yesterday. I started attending classes and, after some minor success in shiai, I was hooked.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Oct
26

Brian Kagen pick: ” Asperger’s Diary” by Lynne Soraya from Psychology Today

“But the bullies were in for a surprise…I didn’t react the way they expected. The previous year, my PE teacher had decided to teach us the basics of Aikido, one of his passions. Deeply affected by Aikido’s philosophy of non-violent self-defense, bolstered by my newly acquired church teachings to “turn the other cheek,” I had become militantly pacifistic. So, I refused to fight. If they persisted, I’d use the Aikido techniques I’d learned to defend myself. But only that.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Oct
25

Brian Kagen pick: “Defensive Tactics: Defined” by Thomas Gerace

“Police defensive tactics are NOT the same as self-defense. The role of defensive tactics in law enforcement and corrections is to assist the officer in performance of arrest and restraint, and to increase the margin of safety for both the officer and the suspect. Defensive tactics charge the officer with protecting others as well as themselves. The definition of “defend” as used here is neither punitive nor passive, but instead “to repel danger or harm while serving and protecting.” Meanwhile, self-defense encompasses any and all means of protecting oneself. Self-defense techniques are not meant to apprehend an assailant. Indeed, there is no regard for the safety of the attacker whatsoever. So obviously self-defense and defensive tactics are not synonymous.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Oct
25

Recommended reading: “Interview with Takafumi Takeno (1)” by Stanley Pranin

The article below has been selected from the extensive archives of the Online Aikido Journal. We believe that an informed readership with knowledge of the history, techniques and philosophy of aikido is essential to the growth of the art and its adherence to the principles espoused by Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba.

Well, we train using energetic and ki-filled techniques that I learned from Shioda Sensei. Although people should enjoy practice, I want them also to remain aware of the severity and seriousness of their training as a martial art, as a budo.

Rather than simply “playing at aikido,” I want to conduct keiko [the word keiko in Japanese, as opposed to the word renshu which means practice or training, has the literal meaning of reflecting on old things, both in one's own experience and from a tradition]. It’s impossible to develop good technique without keiko, so I want people to practice in a way that is enjoyable, but which also embodies natural discipline and produces an atmosphere befitting a martial arts dojo.

The Aikido Journal archives now include more than 800 articles in twenty different languages and numerous video clips. We are constantly adding new articles and translations in our effort to document aikido and related disciplines past and present. If you would like to support us in this effort by taking out a subscription to the Online Aikido Journal we welcome you to do so by clicking this link. Remember that if you subscribe or renew for two years you will now receive the Aiki News / Aikido Journal Archival DVD absolutely free of charge. Don’t pass up this special offer!

Click here to read entire article.

Oct
22

“10000 hours over 28000 days” by Patrick Parker

“Recently there has been a lot of discussion on the Judo Listserver about a concept in the new book titled Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell. I haven’t read the book, but apparently Gladwell found in his research that one factor remains remarkably constant between experts in various domains – practice time. Apparently, it takes on the order of 10000 hours of practice to master a skill to a world-class level, regardless of the skill. This is something that is very interesting to me because of my interest in genius and how experts do the things they do.”

Click here to read article.

Oct
21

“Peace” by Gregor Erdmann

One of the main characteristics of aikido is it aim to see a peaceful resolution to conflict. It has after all been referred to the “Art of Peace” by its founder. As in our mind we do not wish to ‘hurt’ our partner, the use of atemi in training can become largely cosmetic.

If your aikido technique is such that you cannot strongly strike your opponent’s vulnerabilities and are unable to completely disable your attacker, you are probably deluding yourself. The aikidoka should be able to promote peace by choice, not out of necessity. You are not really qualified to fly the peace banner if you are actually incapable of hurting your attacker in the first place.

Click here to read entire blog.

Oct
21

“Aikido is what it is … stop trying to figure it out” by Bruce Baker

Stop .. just stop trying to figure out the founder, picking apart his life, picking apart aikido history as if there was some secret hidden deep in the intersecting coincidences of fate as people come and go .. it is what it is.

Just like looking into a mirror … you have to figure out what you want and who you are.

Who do you want to be? What do you want your Aikido to be?

All this formulation of a caste system to teach aikido and trying to be Japanese is unimportant in light of … what Aikido is. The applications are much more important than the method to learn what is applied.
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