Jul
09

“Aikido vs BJJ, Karate, Judo, Jiu-Jitsu, Kung-fu, etc.” by Connor

“After a long break I’m writing again to add to this blog my thoughts inspired by the discussion at one of our videos in Youtube. The main point of the discussion is: which martial art is better, which one is more effective in real life situations.

Many people think that aikido cannot be effective in “street fighting” or “in the street”, because all of its movements are choreographed and if the attacker does not attack the way we can see in aikido demonstrations then the aikido technique simply can’t be done. Questions in this topic are frequently asked be my beginner students, and they often start to compare martial art styles to one another. They also try to categorise the martial arts.”

Please click here to read entire article.

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Comments

  1. Musashi says that there are only five paths of attack. That’s true in taijutsu as well. O Sensei said something about not watching the sword. The same applies to any attack. The final sophisticated flourish of any attack is irrelevant …if you are already in synch with the larger movement needed to close the distance and stage the move.

    The big difficulty here is that sports deliberately try to eliminate the timing and distance aspects which we employ in aikido. So, if applied in competition, aikido techniques appear forced as compared to those seen in demonstrations. In a certain sense, aikido is a very sophisticated system of “sucker punch”.

  2. Rob Lamb says:

    Having done some training in several martial arts, longest in Aikido, have to say you need to really think about how to utilise the techniques. You can’t spar or use them in competition as they break people, properly.

    I’ve have, however, used the principles in free sparring with others, particularly the small joint manipulation. It doesn’t look good, not all free flowing like in practice, lots of ‘broken technique’ as it’s called. However, once the lock is on it’s game over. That includes doing a sankyo on the ground whilst grappling, stripped down to just the basic of the lock with an elbow pin but it worked. And yes, that was on the floor!

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