Jun
23

Brian Kagen pick: “Daito-Ryu vs.Aikido” from aikidojournal.com

“Generally speaking one can say that Aikido doesn’t include the “jujutsu” type of techniques of Aikijujutsu concentrating more in what is called the “aiki no jutsu” part of Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu, or techniques that emphasize in the timing, and syncronization of mind and body with the opponent’s attack (Obviously both require proper breathing). However Aikido was influenced by other schools in addition to Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu.”

“This is a very general statement since there are many more differences and similarities from different levels not only technically. For instance Aikido is what is called a “gendai budo” type of art and Aikijujutsu is a “koryu” art. You could do your own research on each subject since this might mean different things to different people. There is a lot more to elaborate on in order to answer your question but I’m trying to be as brief as I can. From another stand point I would like to add that Aikido doesn’t include attacks, it is a mere defensive art due to it’s philosophy, also many of the “strikes” were removed from the techniques. From a different level or perspective some people might said that the circular movements in Aikido are wider than Aikijujutsu, that’s in part true and others might state that Aikijujutsu is less refined than Aikido, that to me is a matter of perception. ”

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Comments

  1. nev sagioba says:

    I generally avoid forums and idle argumentativeness like the plague that it is, but I stumbled upon this one in good faith.

    I was going to say,
    “Heaven help us all. When I read such discussions (which is rarely) I’m really concerned for the future of Aikido and budo in general. When people find the time to have this kind of conversation it makes me wonder what they do in training or if they train at all. “Off the rails” is an understatement. Such gratuitously abject and protracted gibberish can only arise from lack of understanding resulting from insufficiency of any meaningful research and too little active practice. There is very little difference between the ryus. The differences are mostly propaganda. Anyone who trains soon finds that there is a limited amount of moves possible for a human bodies interacting. After that its simply a matter of rendering these action efficient and continuing to refine efficiency which is all that Ueshiba meant when he referred to Aikido. Accessing the vast range of nuances in application. Outside of real battle or service of some kind these methods became a means of personal refinement, increasing awareness, enhancing skill and physical fitness, in other words Do; and are not intended as either a method of toxic contest or sterile debate. The supposition that you can exclude something from Aikido or compare irrelevant variables between different schools is erroneous. Its a circular argument. Yes, you can choose to refuse to be aware of some possibilities but then you will be blind to the situations which are likely to kill you because you failed to address a possibility. Unless of course you merely train for the “yoga” like effects. But when you engage conversation simply to get noticed I suppose it doesn’t matter. On the other hand you may not be noticing that you are making a fool of yourself from a safe place. The litmus test is whether you can put you money where your mouth in a real situation. Otherwise simply put up and wait until you have something intelligent to say. Idle talkfesting cannot replace exploration of possibilities in training. For the original question, if you want to find any difference or similarities between any school, instead of exercising the jaw or keyboard muscles; join both, practice both, train both and then draw your own conclusions. Otherwise it’s just idle chatter.”

    But I won’t.
    All I’ll say instead is TRAIN!

  2. Michael says:

    I don’t agree that one has to train in two arts/styles/systems to be able to get an idea of their differences or similarities. Just as I don’t believe that one has to kill in order to understand the combative application of a technique, or fly through space to understand the principles of astro physics.
    You can get an idea of the similarities or differences (or at least others’ opinions on them- which you should then assess for relevance- by listening to what those with experience, through either research or practice- have to say.

    good luck.

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