Jun
07

Brian Kagen pick: “Krav Maga” from wikipedia.com

“Krav Maga has taken many techniques from other martial arts and included elements from Boxing, Muay Thai, Aikido, Judo, and Jujutsu. However, unlike the set routines and choreographed moves in martial arts, Krav Maga teaches realistic fighting and self-defense – attacks in social settings (pubs, clubs, street etc). Typical training often includes exercises simulating fighting against one or several opponents and/or whilst protecting another. This can also involve a debilitating scenario – the use of only one arm, while dizzy and against armed opponents.

Basic training is a mixed aerobic and anaerobic workout, relying heavily on the use of protective pads. In striking this helps the trainee practice his maneuvers at full strength, whilst the holder experiences the impact they would feel when getting hit.”

Please click here to read entire article.

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Comments

  1. bruce baker says:

    Back in 1991 when NO ONE had heard of Krav Maga, much less seen anything like it, my Kempo teach came across a video of training in Krav Maga and we attempted to do the exercises, warm-ups, and add some of the training into our daily training. It looked like a good addition to what we were already doing.

    What I found was … if you want to do it .. it becomes a first strike, beat the hell out of your training partner with high knee strikes and very vigorous physicality. This type of training and fighting seemed to work fine if you were up against an opponent who was both angry and trying to damage you the way you want to damage him/her … aggressive, angry, physical.

    When I came to Aikido in 1997, I found myself completely unbalanced and being victim to my own physicality. The weakness of Aikido was that they did not teach the finishing moves that would incapacitate an attacker, nor did they add the strikes, kicks, or the pressure point activations that would found in many other martial arts for techniques that damage the human body. (Although my Aikido teacher always looked at me strange when I said we were doing jujitsu like Wally Jay taught for Small Circle Jujitsu, go figure)

    My point is … what do you do when you lose that young physical energy and become slow from sickness or old age? Uh … that would mean .. you use whatever works from where ever you can find it for whatever situation you may be in.

    Krav Maga has some very good training and a weird rhythm to it, kind of like Sambo, and either one works when you have to shift gears to throw off an opponent/ attacker. The hardest thing to judge about someone you have never seen fight before is … what kind of rhythm for their attack or defense do they follow. Yeah, it is like music .. when you grasp where it is coming from or going to you can play an instrument or sing along.

    I just never could bring myself to come to the mindset of seriously injuring someone for no reason .. at least until they made their intentions clear and showed me they were serious about going there.