May
10

“It’s in the How” by Gregor Erdmann

“This article follows on from my earlier article titled “Widen the Gap”. I noticed in my classes that the junior students would place their emphasis on the ‘throw’ and display an eagerness to complete the technique and throw their partner. This is perfectly understandable, since that is how we can judge our progress in Aikido.

Yesterday I couldn’t throw person ABC, today I can… progress.

By contrast, the senior students were focusing on their form and perfecting their execution. The relevance of smashing their already helpless uke has diminished in their minds and they were looking for efficiency and refinement in their technique.”

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Comments

  1. I think this is a constantly recursive process. Each iteration begins with form and then incorporates the understanding gained therefrom. The iterations may be in the tempo of seconds, minutes, days, months, years…

    Saito Sensei was quoted to me as saying that we must always consider O Sensei or we will diverge from aikido. I suppose, in light of what I mentioned earlier, we must constantly refer to our understanding of O Sensei, and that understanding originally came from our teacher(s).

    So, using my arborist analogy, if you are a student of a student of a student of O Sensei, are you closer to O Sensei than somebody who drifts from dojo to dojo, reads and studies the old O Sensei movies?

    My pruning exercise is aimed at opening some light for a shaded tree. Next I have to select some likely suckers to leave which, hopefully, will grow toward that light. If my effort, and the tree’s, succeeds, the shaded tree will be more balanced.

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