Apr
30

“Interview with Ms. Hiroku Tai” by Kenta Shimizu

“When I started with Aikido I was relatively tall compared with other women, und when I practiced with men, I used a lot of physical strength. I think that I practiced with a face showing that I did not want to loose against the men. But of course there is a difference to men regarding physical strength, and I was troubled quickly. In the same year at the university was a small built girl among the students, who of course was no physical match for the much taller men, and she simply practiced her way. One day she made sudden progress. In Aikido you do not collide with the frontal power of an attack, but it is a Budo art, where you ward off an attack, and react using natural movements. This girl very quickly became aware that she was not able to perform the techniques using physical strength, and she used this knowledge to her advantage. She was fully aware of her abilities and practiced an Aikido with a lively body. When I watched this girl, I thought that this was the way to turn your own weakness into forte.”

Please click here to read entire article.

Apr
29

Brian Kagen pick: “The Fairchild Air Force Base Judo Club, 1951-1960″ by Joseph R. Svinth

“The US Army Air Corps established the Spokane Air Depot on Sunday, March 1, 1942. The location was selected because Spokane businessmen donated $101,078.66 worth of land and standing crops to the Army for its construction. (Which was hardly as charitable as it sounds, as the post soon employed 15,500 civilians, and had a payroll of nearly a million dollars a month.) The post was 95% complete by July 1943, and served throughout World War II. Although deactivated in 1947, it was reactivated in January 1948 as Spokane Air Force Base, and given to the newly organized Strategic Air Command (SAC) as a bomber base.

SAC of 1948 was more bark than bite, and planes and crews were not in the best of shape, as was proven when its B-29s deployed to Japan for missions over Korea in 1950. The new commander of SAC, Lt. Gen. Curtis E. LeMay, decided that if SAC was to be America’s nuclear deterrent, its men and equipment should be the best available. Therefore he started a slew of new programs.
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Apr
29

“Use-of-Force continued” by Keoni May

The Use-of-Force law, as it is practiced within the State of New York, has many similarities to other states. Therefore, most of what I have said, and what I will discuss, has relevance to all martial artists.

When I spoke previously about martial artists and the Use-of-Force, I knew that I was opening up a “can of worms.”

In regards to criminals having a firearm, an edged weapon, or a dangerous looking blunt force instrument (baseball bat, crow bar, ball peen hammer, etc.), you must always consider surrendering your valuables, if you cannot wind him with wild and reckless abandon marathon sprinting.
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Apr
29

“Kanai Shihan Memorial” from youtube.com

“A memorial video of Aikido Shihan, Mitsunari Kanai-Sensei, of the New England Aikikai.The images are from various sources.The soundtrack is “Red Dragonfly” from the CD “Song of The Seashore” by James Galway. ”

Please click here to read entire article.

Apr
28

Recommended reading: “Interview with Kisaburo Osawa” by Katsuaki Terasawa

The article below has been selected from the extensive archives of the Online Aikido Journal. We believe that an informed readership with knowledge of the history, techniques and philosophy of aikido is essential to the growth of the art and its adherence to the principles espoused by Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba.

Only a fool would brag that he could win a fight against 10 men, a pistol or a machine gun. I think that as a result of regular, hard training a person necessarily feels humble. Aikido training is indeed very severe, but you have to teach the safest way possible. If students have a clear goal in mind you have to teach them well so they do not lose interest. Don’t stop working hard! If a student tires you must take him by the hand; if he falls down you extend your hand and help him up. From the student’s point of view, if he stumbles before reaching his goal, I think he should observe his teacher and follow his example. I don’t know how others feel, but that is my opinion.

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Apr
28

“Interview with Christian Tissier Shihan” by Guillaume Erard

“After a very dynamic morning class, we went for a very pleasant lunch with Christian Tissier and some comity members of the AFA in a lovely brasserie in Brussels. There we had an informal talk and the two Shihan of the day (Christian Tissier had just awarded Dany Leclerre with this distinction on behalf of Doshu Moriteru Ueshiba that very morning) shared many colourful anecdotes about their many years of practice. We then headed back for the afternoon class and it is later in the afternoon that Ivan (my colleague from Aikidoka Magazine) and I met Sensei again in his changing room to finally ask him all the questions that we had prepared for so long. He pointed very intense blue eyes on us, giving us his complete attention for over an hour (almost forgetting heading back to catch his flight in the process…). He answered questions with great precision and a disarming honesty which made the interview all the more interesting and enjoyable. We mainly went through the specificities of his teaching as well as the general organisation and functioning of Aikido.”

Please click here to read entire article.

Click here for DVD featuring Christian Tissier offered by Aikido Journal.

Apr
27

“Overtraining” by Amos Gil’ad

“1. The object of all training is to increase performance ability. When training is successful, performance ability increases. Not without limit: As you approach the genetically predetermined limits of your potential, the _rate_ of increase goes down. But even long before that, there may be times in which there is no change – so-called plateaux or sticking points. This is natural. There are also times at which performance ability decreases: Planned decreases, for recuperation (for example, during the transition period in a properly periodized annual cycle) or Accidental ones: Because of injury, illness or even stress unrelated to sports (familial, academic, financial are obvious examples). **When specific performance ability decreases without any apparent reason, often while general ability is unimpaired, overtraining may be the culprit**”

Please click here to read entire article.

Apr
27

Brian Kagen pick:”Tempu Nakamura” from wikipedia.com

“Born in Tokyo, Japan, his original name was Saburo (Japanese: 三郎). He was the son of Nakamura Sukeoki (中村祐興 1829-1909) of Fukuoka-ken and Nakamura Teu (中村テウ 1858-1928) of Tokyo, known as Edo at the time. His father introduced the use of paper money in Japan when he served as the bureau director of the Japanese Ministry of Finance. Tempu Nakamura later moved to Fukuoka-shi (福岡市, Fukuoka City), Fukuoka-ken (福岡県) to live with a relative. Once there, he took private lessons from an Englishman and enrolled in the Shüyükan (Japanese: 修猷館, now Fukuoka Prefectural Shuyukan High School in Sawara-ku) school where English was the medium of instruction and where he became proficient in his family’s style of judo (随変流) and also trained in kenjutsu and iaijutsu. During judo practice, he totally defeated an opponent from Kumamoto who then tried to kill Nakamura in revenge. In the violent encounter, Nakamura stabbed and killed his assailant, which was ruled legitimate self-defence. He left the school and joined Genyosha ultra-nationalist secret society, forming a friendship with Toyama Mitsuru.”

Please click here to read entire article.

Apr
26

“Business Aikido” by Mark Walsh

“I spent an enjoyable and full-on day at the London ExCeL this Wednesday for the CIPD 2009 HRD Exhibition and Conference. I was researching others working with stress, team building and leadership and visiting friends at the training exhibition.

There was plenty of what I’d call “old business” on show – dull stands using boring big words and people impersonating David Brent or US-style positive thinking gurus. Authenticity, “Conscious Business” or “Human Business” involving moving beyond adversarial models is still far from the norm. I listened to one presenter talk about negotiation who said he didn’t believe in “win-win” and used the word “opponent” a dozen times. He’s not my opponent, I don’t believe his world-view will result in anyone “winning” or that it’s what’s needed to get us out of the current mess. Just a fervent prayer…”

Please click here to read entire article.

Apr
26

“A look through the veil” by Louis Gonzalez-Coca

“Sincere attacks including grabs are strikes are required
to study the effective application of any technique…”

Today I will start by attacking you with a Yokomenuchi aimed to your right side, I will also use a Shomenuchi but I’ll let you know about it in advance, see you later at the dojo.

Best regards… Uke

I am a former Aikido practitioner and like many others I still enjoy reading articles in the matter also because it relates to the to the Koryu tradition I am currently studying. In the past I have visited a few Aikido Dojos in the USA and have trained under a few different schools. I believe that Aikido, for its very nature and philosophy, attracts and retains people who are mostly individuals of passive and tranquil disposition.
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Apr
26

Recommended reading: “Founder of Aikido (15): Move To Ayabe” by Kisshomaru Ueshiba

The article below has been selected from the extensive archives of the Online Aikido Journal. We believe that an informed readership with knowledge of the history, techniques and philosophy of aikido is essential to the growth of the art and its adherence to the principles espoused by Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba.

It was the late spring of 1920 that he moved to Ayabe. He was 37. Initially, they rented a two-story house in Ayabe, just outside the west gate of Omoto. The first thing the Founder did was to buy sixty bales of rice, enough to feed a family of six for two or three years. It sounds so much like him, to feel that as long as he had thus secured the supply of food for the family, he was free to do as he pleased. Soon after, on Master Deguchi’s recommendation, they moved to another house beside a bamboo forest behind the old elementary school at the foot of Hongu (Main Hall) Mountain. Master Onisaburo said, “You are the person who will become the No. 1 budo man in Japan,” explaining why he had chosen that particular location.

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Apr
25

“I am transformed when I practice … NOT!!” by Bruce Baker

How many hundred of posts, articles, and quotes have I read that mention in some way that someone is transformed when they step onto the mat, into the dojo, or are morphed into that super-hero when trouble is in their faces?

It is not the dogi that give you the power of Aikido.
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