Nov
09

Morihiro Saito’s “Traditional Aikido” books back in print!

We are pleased to notify readers that we are now able to offer Morihiro Saito Sensei’s Traditional Aikido books starting with Volume 1, “Basic Techniques” available immediately!

This is a brand-new edition done in the exact style and format of the original books by Saito Sensei that took the aikido world by storm when they were released in the 1970s. These are hardcover volumes made for durability featuring a semi-gloss paper like the originally published volumes.

For years these books have been out-of-print and were sold for hundreds of dollars on sites such as ebay.com. Now you can own this collector’s item in brand-new, mint condition for your aikido library. Volume 2 will be released shortly and an announcement will follow soon. The remaining books of the series–five in total–will be published in succession thereafter.

Click here for more information and to order Traditional Aikido, Volume 1.

Click here for Traditional Aikido, Volume 2 which is also available on a pre-order basis at a special discounted rate!

Nov
09

Brian Kagen pick: “At What Cost Our Spirit” by David Valadez

“Once when I asked my teacher how much he practiced a day, he answered, ‘I practice twenty-four hours a day.’ Wanting to only see if my training time was adequate to follow his example of skill in the art, I was not wholly ready for his answer. Much of it escaped me at the time. I could not totally see the fusion of life and practice that he was attempting to point me toward. The practice for me was still a matter of doing something while not doing something else.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Nov
08

Aiki Jo, Part 2: “Ichi no Jo” by Autrelle Holland

The first kumijo is a close cousin of the first 6 moves in the 31 Kumijo. Let’s talk about what uchijo does first. Uchi attacks from hidari tsuki no kamae with choku tsuki, and then uses uchi choku barai to parry a counter thrust. So right away we learn that there is protection even as there is an attack being made. Uchi then attacks again with choku tsuki. After that, uchi steps back to parry a strike with migi kaeshi barai. I remember Patricia Hendricks Sensei at a seminar once calling this parry uke nagashi. After this, uchi finishes up with migi gyakute tsuki.
[Read more...]

Nov
07

Brian Kagen pick: “A Catalogue of Various and Sundry Things that are Out to Get You, and Their Aiki Counters” by Ross Robertson

“Attacks can come in many different forms, and from many different directions. Moreover, an attack must necessarily carry with it a quantity of energy, and this force will be characterized by any of a number of classifiable qualities. The following is a brief compendium of the variety of attack characteristics, each designated by a descriptive title. After the explanatory paragraph, suggestions on appropriate aiki response strategies are given.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire article.

Nov
06

“Glue Feet” by Nev Sagiba

ablogicon_nev“What makes Aikido different from other mashal-arts?” some in the group once asked Sensei when the seniors were trying to get him drunk enough to reveal secrets. Presumable they were not OBSERVING in class because Sensei, whilst tacit gave away secrets freely.

BY EXAMPLE. But these guys wanted words.

Sensei grunted in his inimitable way. I could feel the discomfort.

“Move whole body,” he finally said.

Lots of talk followed as Sensei quietly sipped his Bourbon and Coke. The talkfest permutated multiple possibilities and finally the accountant turned to Sensei and asked, “What do you mean by ‘move whole body’?”

In the old world they had insulted him enough already, but these were modern city westerners and knew no better.

Sensei sat quietly and whilst appearing bemused was probably thinking, “How thick can these gaijin be?” Or maybe he was overwhelmed with compassion, who knows. But he never voiced it.

Grunting or clearing his throat, I’m not sure which, he appeared to be pondering.

Finally he said, “Move whole body,” with a sincere and respectful tone that suggested, even across the then linguistic barrier; that this could not be improved upon.

Now Sensei is one of nature’s gentlemen. O’Sensei would have simply waked away and Takeda Sokaku would have mostly likely demonstrated most firmly on the questioner for daring to ask stupid questions. But this was a different world.
[Read more...]

Nov
06

Brian Kagen pick: “A Randori Workout at Shodokan”

“During the one-hour randori workouts at Shodokan, the following sequence of drills is typical. The person holding the knife is called the tanto (after the fact that a dagger in Japanese is called a tanto.) The unarmed person is referred to as the toshu (literally unarmed) player.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire blog.

Nov
05

“Aiki Jo” by Autrelle Holland

So for the past few months, I have been drilling my Aiki Jo. Surely, mine is a tired jo! I have reached some personal conclusions, nothing profound or mind blowing, but I thought I would type this out so that my brain has room for more stuff.

As I understand it, the jo of Aikido is a tool for self perfection. It has many lessons to teach, and many attributes to develop.

[Read more...]

Nov
04

Brian Kagen pick: :”Interview with Kaz Tanahashi Sensei” from Aikido Today Magazine

“An artist, teacher, and environmentalist, Kazuaki Tanahashi was born in Japan, where he studied painting and calligraphy. He now teaches brushwork for retreats at California School of Japanese Arts (Santa Rosa, CA) and Zen Mountain Monastery (Mt. Tremper, NY). His many publications include Moon in a Dewdrop: Writings of Zen Master Dogen and two books available through the ATM Book and Video Service: Essential Zen and Brush Mind. He also was one of the translators of Doshu Kisshomaru Ueshiba’s book Aikido.”

Brian Kagen is an avid web researcher with a particular interest in martial arts. His training background includes both judo and aikido. He has contributed hundreds of article links over the years for AJ readers.

Click here to read entire interview.

Nov
03

December 9 release! Pre-order “Traditional Aikido, Volume 2″ by Morihiro Saito now!

More exciting news on the book front! We are now accepting pre-orders for Traditional Aikido, Volume 2 by Morihiro Saito, 9th dan. This important book covered for the first time the Kumitachi and Tachidori techniques that define the Aiki Ken and the Kumijo and Jodori techniques that characterize the Aiki Jo. This book was revolutionary at the time of its publication and remains the standard text on the subject even today.

Just as with Traditional Aikido, Volume 1 recently republished, this is a brand-new edition done in the exact style and format of the original books by Saito Sensei that took the aikido world by storm when they were released in the 1970s. These are hardcover volumes made for durability featuring a semi-gloss paper like the originally published volumes.

[Read more...]

Nov
03

T.K. Chiba Shihan Revisits the Hut Dojo

On October 31st 2008 TK Chiba Shihan met with the three surviving Aikido pioneers of British Aikido at the now internationally famed ” Hut Dojo ” Hillingdon Middlesex UK. Chiba Shihan last visited the Hut Dojo 41 years ago in 1967. Over lunch and a pint of beer in the Hut Pub next door many memories and memorable events were fondly remembered of the illustrious Budo Masters who had visited the Hut Dojo from 1955 as follows – Kenshiro Abbe – T Abe – M Nakazono – M Noro – TK Chiba – Y Kobayashi – H Tada – M Harada – M Otani – T Otani.
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Nov
03

Review of “Aikido, Keri-waza” by Clark Bateman

This new book (lulu.com 2008) is an interesting foray “outside the box” of conventional Aikido thinking. While Aikido is generally described as a defensive art, many from within and without have questioned its effectiveness in a realistic scenario. One reason for this is that the various attacks, and therefore the various defenses, contained in the typical Aikido syllabus are very limited in scope, especially if viewed from a realtime fighter’s perspective.
[Read more...]

Nov
02

Brian Kagen pick: “Daniel Wescott on Kimusubi (freeform aikido)”

“I began training Freeform Aikido in February of this year, since joining I have been surprised by the number of unexpected benefits to be found in this discipline. Aside from the obvious benefits of training to improve physical fitness and co-ordination I have also found that the practice has given me a space to explore ideas that have been of great interest to me in my creative practice as a designer, in particular the notion of reading intent.”
[Read more...]