Sep
23

Kokyu Nage Tenchi Nage explained! Shizuo Imaizumi’s Online Ki Aikido Video Course

Special Offer available through Monday, September 29th!

Many practitioners today are only vaguely conscious of the masters responsible for building the infrastructure of modern aikido. Koichi Tohei — aikido’s first 10th dan — was such a figure and left an incredible body of knowledge and techniques that shaped the growth of today’s art. Tohei Sensei passed in 2011. Among Tohei Sensei’s original students carrying forward his legacy, Shizuo Imaizumi Sensei stands among a select group of teachers qualified to teach and explain the origin and evolution of Ki Aikido to our modern generation. This is your opportunity to get the very best study aid available to gain real skills in this system and deepen your grasp of the art. Welcome to the world of Ki Aikido!

What’s Inside the Shizuo Imaizumi Ki Aikido Course…

● 47 hi-res video modules
● Option to view content online or download to your device
● Unlimited access to course content
● Principles of Ki explained and demonstrated
● Ki No Taiso explained and demonstrated
● Basic techniques of Ki Aikido developed by Koichi Tohei
● In-depth interview with Shizuo Imaizumi by Stanley Pranin
● Learn backstories of important events of aikido history
Modern aikido was born in Japan in the years following World War II. At the forefront of the dissemination of Morihei Ueshiba’s martial art were the founder’s son, Kisshomaru, and the gifted Koichi Tohei. Tohei, in particular, was a leading light and gathered around him many of the young talents of the Aikikai Hombu Dojo in Tokyo. Among them was Shizuo Imaizumi, one of Tohei Sensei’s closest students and a member of his inner circle.

When Koichi Tohei resigned from the Aikikai in 1974 — one of the most traumatic events of the young’s arts history — Imaizumi Sensei remained loyal and was one of the few with whom Tohei Sensei confided.

With the founding of Tohei’s Shinshin Toitsu Aikido, Imaizumi Sensei was sent to New York City in 1975 to develop and oversee aikido dojos on the east coast who had joined Tohei Sensei’s Ki no Kenkyukai organization. He became chief instructor of the Ki Society in the United States in 1980, a position he held for three years.

In 1987, after a long association with Koichi Tohei, Imaizumi Sensei temporarily retired from aikido and returned to Japan. Imaizumi Sensei returned to New York City in 1988 from where he assumed responsibility for a group of aikido dojos that had become independent of Tohei’s Ki Society organization. The new umbrella association was called the Shin-Budo Kai and Imaizumi Sensei became its chief instructor. From that time forward, he has continued his teaching activities and research into Ki Aikido and its underlying principles.

After two years in the making, we are delighted to release Shizuo Imaizumi Sensei’s Ki Aikido course produced in collaboration with Aikido Journal. This content-rich course consisting of 47 modules will introduce you to the world of Ki Aikido taught in the tradition of Koichi Tohei, 10th dan.

For those desiring to learn Ki Aikido from one of the art’s top experts, Shizuo Imaizumi’s Ki Aikido Course will provide instruction in the entire basic curriculum. Few have mastered this subject matter to the degree Imaizumi Sensei has as one of Tohei Sensei’s original students. He will explain the Ki principles forming the basis of Tohei Sensei’s aikido. Imaizumi Sensei will also demonstrate the entire set of the genial Ki No Taiso exercises that were once practiced at the Aikikai and which few remember today. To top off this important course material, Aikido Journal Editor Stanley Pranin conducts a lengthy video interview of Imaizumi Sensei containing first-hand witness testimony on several pivotal historical events in the early days of the art.

Click here to watch video

Sep
22

O-Sensei’s Shomenuchi Ikkyo: The old way… or the right way? by Stanley Pranin

This photo has enormous significance as a technical anchor reference. Taken in 1938, it shows a much younger Morihei Ueshiba beginning to execute what we would today call shomenuchi ikkyo omotewaza. What will appear odd to many present-day aikidoka is the fact that the Founder is initiating the technique.

For most practitioners, common sense dictates that uke will initiate the encounter, with tori (= nage) responding. Yet if we consult O-Sensei’s 1938 Budo manual, we find the following description of the commencement of this technique…

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Sep
22

Koichi Tohei’s Aikido Curriculum: Shizuo Imaizumi’s Online Ki Aikido Video Course

Special Offer Available through Monday, September 29th!

Modern aikido was born in Japan in the years following World War II. At the forefront of the dissemination of Morihei Ueshiba’s martial art were the founder’s son, Kisshomaru, and the gifted Koichi Tohei. Tohei, in particular, was a leading light and gathered around him many of the young talents of the Aikikai Hombu Dojo in Tokyo. Among them was Shizuo Imaizumi, one of Tohei Sensei’s closest students and a member of his inner circle.

When Koichi Tohei resigned from the Aikikai in 1974 — one of the most traumatic events of the young’s arts history — Imaizumi Sensei remained loyal and was one of the few with whom Tohei Sensei confided.

With the founding of Tohei’s Shinshin Toitsu Aikido, Imaizumi Sensei was sent to New York City in 1975 to develop and oversee aikido dojos on the east coast who had joined Tohei Sensei’s Ki no Kenkyukai organization. He became chief instructor of the Ki Society in the United States in 1980, a position he held for three years.

In 1987, after a long association with Koichi Tohei, Imaizumi Sensei temporarily retired from aikido and returned to Japan. Imaizumi Sensei returned to New York City in 1988 from where he assumed responsibility for a group of aikido dojos that had become independent of Tohei’s Ki Society organization. The new umbrella association was called the Shin-Budo Kai and Imaizumi Sensei became its chief instructor. From that time forward, he has continued his teaching activities and research into Ki Aikido and its underlying principles.

After two years in the making, we are delighted to release Shizuo Imaizumi Sensei’s Ki Aikido course produced in collaboration with Aikido Journal. This content-rich course consisting of 47 modules will introduce you to the world of Ki Aikido taught in the tradition of Koichi Tohei, 10th dan.

For those desiring to learn Ki Aikido from one of the art’s top experts, Shizuo Imaizumi’s Ki Aikido Course will provide instruction in the entire basic curriculum. Few have mastered this subject matter to the degree Imaizumi Sensei has as one of Tohei Sensei’s original students. He will explain the Ki principles forming the basis of Tohei Sensei’s aikido. Imaizumi Sensei will also demonstrate the entire set of the genial Ki No Taiso exercises that were once practiced at the Aikikai and which few remember today. To top off this important course material, Aikido Journal Editor Stanley Pranin conducts a lengthy video interview of Imaizumi Sensei containing first-hand witness testimony on several pivotal historical events in the early days of the art.

Many practitioners today are only vaguely conscious of the masters responsible for building the infrastructure of modern aikido. Koichi Tohei — aikido’s first 10th dan — was such a figure and left an incredible body of knowledge and techniques that shaped the growth of today’s art. Tohei Sensei passed in 2011. Among Tohei Sensei’s original students carrying forward his legacy, Shizuo Imaizumi Sensei stands among a select group of teachers qualified to teach and explain the origin and evolution of Ki Aikido to our modern generation. This is your opportunity to get the very best study aid available to gain real skills in this system and deepen your grasp of the art. Welcome to the world of Ki Aikido!

Click here to watch video

Sep
19

Bring the 31 kata alive! Morihiro Saito’s genial 31-kata kumi jo

In this video, Stephanie Yap and Kaspar Jensen perform the 31 Kumi Jo in Iwama. This kata was devised by Morihiro Saito Sensei to allow paired practice of the movements of the 31-jo kata. Stephanie Yap Sensei earned a 6th degree black belt and the Menkyo Kaiden in Aiki-Ken and Aiki-Jo which were awarded to her by the late Morihiro Saito Sensei, 9th dan…

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Sep
19

How it all started! “The Improbable Launch of My Career as an Aikido Historian,” by Stanley Pranin

I had great hopes of being able to conduct research on aikido history while I was there, but got almost no cooperation from the Japanese side. I did have one success of great importance on the research side. I had Bob Frager’s articles on O-Sensei with me in Tokyo, and one day sat down to take a good look at them. I knew I had only some of the articles, but did not know how many there were in the series, or when or where they were published. Let me tell you how I solved this problem…a href=”http://members.aikidojournal.com/improbable-launch-of-my-career-as-aikido-historian-by-stanley-pranin/” target=”_blank”>

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Sep
19

Beyond the realm of ordinary reality! Yukiyoshi Sagawa: Daito- ryu Master by Kiyokazu Maebayashi

“I felt instinctively that I had finally encountered a true martial artist for the first and probably last time and knew immediately what I must do… What was even more mysterious was that in the beginning, I didn’t even notice that my balance had been broken because I didn’t feel him use any power…

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Sep
18

Mission to teach aikido… “How Aikido changed my life,” by Daniel Brasse

As I sat quietly in seiza next to Saito Sensei’s bed, with Rie-san translating his words, a mixture of emotions ran through me. How could it be that Saito Sensei, a mountain of a man who seemed so indestructible, be so ill and stuck in bed? He will somehow beat this cancer and come back on the mat to teach, I thought…

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Sep
18

Spectacular Ukemi performances! Doshu Kisshomaru Ueshiba in Paris (1980) featuring Moriteru Ueshiba, Hayato Osawa, and Christian Tissier

The demonstration of Second Aikido Doshu Kisshomaru Ueshiba during the 3rd Congress of the International Aikido Federation in Paris, 1980. Ukes are Moriteru Ueshiba Waka Sensei, Hayato Osawa Sensei, and Christian Tissier Sensei…

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Sep
18

Aikido began here… “Iwama: Birthplace of Aikido,” by Stanley Pranin

If asked, many aikido practitioners could not explain how aikido came into being. At best they would mutter words to the effect that Morihei Ueshiba was the founder of aikido, and that he created the art either before or after the war, depending on whatever story they have heard.

Of course, from a historical standpoint, aikido evolved over a period of many years. The more well-known organizations describe the process differently, usually in terms of their own creation.

A very strong argument — also espoused by Morihei’s son Kisshomaru Ueshiba — can be developed that aikido was created during and immediately following World War II in Iwama. It was here that the Founder had time to concentrate fully on his personal endeavors that included farming, meditation, and aikido practice.

This article goes into the subject of how Morihei ended up in the country town of Iwama and the daily life and activities of Morihei Ueshiba with emphasis on the period of 1942-1955. This time frame was crucial to the development of modern aikido.

Be sure to read through this article as it is well documented, and will almost certainly contain new information for those wishing to better understand the fascinating process of how aikido was born!

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Sep
17

Shouldn’t have intervened! “Two extremes pushing on me from either side,” by Charles Humphrey

It’s funny to see you post something like this right now because I had a similar experience just a few months ago and I still can’t figure out what I did wrong. I ask myself if I shouldn’t have intervened, but the possible alternative of watching four men who, if not friends, I was at least acquainted with for years, beaten up and potentially killed by more than twenty men motivated largely by xenophobia would have left me more damaged than the actual incident that happened.I was pulled to a bar I don’t normally frequent by some good friends I’d met up with earlier. I’d gone out for a walk when my girlfriend went to sleep early and I felt wide awake…

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Sep
17

FREE PDF DOWNLOAD! Aiki News Number 60, March 1984

Contents

● Editorial – Blueprint for the standardization of aikido testing, by Stanley Pranin
● Shoji Nishio Interview, by Stanley Pranin
● Morihiro Saito Technical Notebook — Tsuki iriminage, by Morihiro Saito
● Heard in the Dojo
● O-Sensei Biography — “The Kobukan Hell Dojo Period,” by Kisshomaru Ueshiba
● Letters to the Editor

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Sep
17

In Japan for the first time! “Koichi Tohei in the Heyday of the Aikikai” by Stanley Pranin

My efforts to gather materials on the Founder met with little success. I was able to buy a few books and several back issues of the Aikido Shimbun published by the dojo, but my requests through the office to obtain copies of photographs or films led to no concrete results. Finally near the end of my stay I asked Iwao Tamura, one of Tohei Sensei’s deshi who was fluent in English, if it would be possible to ask Tohei Sensei again about helping me. As a result, I was called to a room on the second floor of the dojo late in August. Present were Tohei Sensei, Mr. Tamura and myself. I was told clearly that I was considered to be a student of Tohei student and as such was mistaken to have trained with other teachers during my stay in Japan…

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