May
28

Strong martial spirit! Hayato Osawa demonstrates his powerful style of aikido

In this video, Hayato Osawa, son of the late 9th dan Kisaburo Osawa, displays his style of strong, precise aikido. His techniques are characterized by a strong martial spirit and physicality even though he is of a small stature. He demonstrates suwariwaza, hanmi handachi, and standing techniques on this occasion. Osawa Sensei is one of the senior instructors at the Aikikai Hombu Dojo in Tokyo…

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May
28

Now 85 years of age! Hiroshi Tada Sensei, 9th dan, in Switzerland

This video contains scenes from a demonstration given by Hiroshi Tada Sensei in Russia. He is one of the last active members of the early postwar generation of instructors formed at the Aikikai Hombu Dojo in Tokyo. Tada Sensei is noted for his fluid, dynamic aikido and his approach readily evident in this clip…

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May
28

Incontrovertible proof from O-Sensei! “Nage should initiate for shomenuchi techniques”

Morihei Ueshiba stresses in his 1938 technical manual titled “Budo” that in the shomenuchi iriminage technique, nage should seize the initiative and begin an entering movement in contrast to the norm in aikido practice where uke acts first. The rationale behind this seemingly odd manner of treating this technique is complex enough to demand special treatment as it has far-reaching implications…

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May
27

Don’t allow your partner to reset! Bruce Bookman Sensei explains “connection” using katatedori ikkyo as an example

In this video, Bruce Bookman of Tenzan Aikido in Seattle discusses the importance of maintaining a connection with one’s partner using katatedori ikkyo as an example: “My aikido practice includes early influences of Yoshimitsu Yamada, and later practice under Kisshomaru Ueshiba, and other prominent teachers in Japan at the Aikikai Headquarters such as Osawa, Yamaguchi, Arikawa, and Tada Senseis. I spent 16 years practicing under T.K. Chiba Sensei, who was a very close disciple of Morihei Uyeshiba, the Founder of Aikido”…

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May
27

Unusual hip throw! Christian Tissier Sensei at the Cercle Tissier in Paris in 2000

This video presents highlights of a class conducted by Christian Tissier Sensei at his Cercle Tissier in Paris in November 2000. This is a very interesting sequence of a modified hip throws as well as katatedori shihonage and iriminage…

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May
27

Operating from Uke’s zone… More from the “Zone Theory of Aikido” Course

I would like to discuss the topic of operating from Uke’s zone. What can you do if you are not able to enter into your partner’s blind spot? What if you have to move in front where he can easily see and attack you In this case, you need to employ different tools in order to seize the initiative from your partner.

Among the most effective are atemi — strike to a vital point — and kiai — the combative shout. Using such methods as these, it is possible to induce a “flinch reflex” and regain the initiative from your partner. From there, it becomes possible to apply an effective technique because your partner’s attack is neutralized…

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May
26

Inhabiting the circle… “Aikido Koan,” by Nick Lowry

The way to work with a koan is to be all the parts of it-to inhabit each nook and cranny and find out how you inform it and it informs you… much like learning aikido. Understanding the physical principles, the rules of play and etiquette, the arcane verbiage, the techniques, the kihon, the kata, the henka , on and on-all the bits and pieces of the activity of learning the art are not themselves the art. AIkido is not only learned it must be realized…

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May
26

Morihei Ueshiba O-Sensei: “When an enemy tries to fight, he is already defeated!”

This colorized image of the Founder of Aikido, Morihei Ueshiba, is presented together with one of his most famous aphorisms from the Memoir of the Master. The photo was colorized by talented graphic designer and aikidoka Nikos Gazetas. Please share it freely.Gracias a todos quienes que nos han ayudado con la traducción al español de estas palabras del fundador Morihei Ueshiba…

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May
26

Don’t repeat the same mistakes! Get to a safe place unbalancing your attacker… Then apply your technique

While applying techniques, aikido practitioners often focus on how to manipulate joints or throw down an opponent. Many forget the all important fact that you need to be properly positioned first before a technique can become effective. From which angles does the attacker have the advantage? Where are the attacker’s weak spots? This subject is of utmost importance in the “Zone Theory of Aikido”. See how this works in this video…

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May
25

Go and find your own aikido! “Applying modern training method- ologies to Aikido practice” by Peter Kelly

In truth, there was not a kinesthetic learner amongst them, a group of intellectuals that had come to aikido due to its spiritual teachings and philosophy that protected them from the competition that had so exposed their physical ineptitude in their youth. These were passive – aggressive personality types that lay claim to study and teach a martial art, yet their training and actions were completely lacking any basis for the reality that was a physical conflict situation…

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May
25

Founder of Tendokan Aikido… “Interview with Kenji Shimizu”

It is necessary to train the spirit through the repetition of techniques. I think that if you focus on technique alone you cannot develop strength. I believe that one becomes strong unconsciously through serious repetitive practice. When I read books on the old martial artists a man was considered strong if he was bloodthirsty. I’m not sure about that. A person who is truly strong does not display such an attitude…

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May
25

Challenging the Status Quo! Watch video introduction to Stanley Pranin’s “Zone Theory of Aikido Course”

“I consider one of the biggest hurdles to improving one’s skills is the almost universal tendency to resort to physical strength in attempting to make techniques work. When aikido practitioners get stuck, they tense up and try to force their way through the technique. I see this everywhere I go. For many years, I experienced the same thing in my own training. Only in the last few years, have I been able to discover ways of using the body as a unified structure when applying techniques.”

The “Zone Theory of Aikido” contains 25 carefully planned lessons that outline a different approach to aikido training that is style agnostic. We believe many readers will find its content highly relevant to their aikido practice…

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